Punjab Research Group

MILANGE BABEY RATAN DE MELE TE (LET’S MEET AT BABA RATAN’S FAIR)

Posted in Events, Film by Pippa on October 26, 2012
Documentary screening: Sufism and the Dalits of East Punjab

Followed by discussion with the director Ajay Bhardwaj and Prof. Amin Mughal
Time: 7pm, Tuesday 13th November 2012
Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG
Hosted by: SOAS Pakistan Society
This film explores the idea of Punjabiyat, in ways seen and unseen, in the way it continues to inhabit the universe of the average Punjabi’s everyday life, language, culture, memories and consciousness. This is the universe that this film stumbles upon in the countryside of East Punjab, in India. Following the patters of lived life, it moves fluidly and eclectically across time, mapping organic cultural continuities at the local levels. It is a universe, which reaffirms the fact that cultures cannot be erased so very easily. It is where the love of Heer and Ranjah rather than the divisions of the priestly class are celebrated. This is a universe marked by a rich tradition of cultural co-existence and exchange, where the boundaries between the apparently monolithic religious identities of ‘Hindu’, ‘Muslim’ and ‘Sikh’ are blurred and subverted in the most imaginative ways.

“Bhardwaj’s film further attests to the great pull the soil exercises over the people who were once rooted in it but had been forced to leave, “ Ishitaq Ahmed, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Stockholm University.

http://ajaybhardwaj.in/

Poster: SOAS poster 2
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Milange Babey Ratan De Mele Te – Lets Meet at Baba Ratan’s Fair

Posted in Events, Film by Pippa on October 26, 2012
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GLOCUL LECTURE 2012 – Reconceptualizing India Studies by Prof S.N. Balagangadhara

Posted in News/Information by gsjandu on October 25, 2012

Reconceptualizing India Studies

6.00pm, Tuesday 11 December 2012

David Sizer Lecture Theatre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS

Professor S.N. Balagangadhara is Director of the Research Centre Vergelijkende  Cutuurwetenschap (Comparative Science of Cultures) and the founder of the India Platform at Ghent University in Belgium. A drinks reception will precede the event and all attendees are welcome to join Centre for Culture and Law academics and School of Law students from 6pm, for a 6.30pm start.

The Centre for Culture and Law’s research agenda links legal pluralism, legal culture, and socio-legal studies more broadly, to culture, ethnicity, religion, migration, citizenship, diasporas, and transnationalism. An interdisciplinary blending of these fields is at the focus of GLOCUL’s research agenda.
A formal invitation is attached with this email, please feel free to forward this to colleagues and friends.

To reserve a place please visit www.qmculturelaw.eventbrite.com

Udham Singh Reading Room. London. 21st September to 18th November 2012.

Posted in News/Information by gsjandu on October 25, 2012

Punjab’s Icons: Sagoo’s Exercise in Remembrance

Tajender has suceeded in doing two things; firstly providing access to a beloved Punjab icon to a new audience via the choice of venue and secondly opening up the debate on the secular / religious nature of the icon’s actions. Both points will be remembered for the pioneering medium of exhibition used.

Textiles, paper and heraldic colours adorning the reading room do more than prick the imagination, they blow a gale force into the psyche. In some ways the vividness of the room are a delicate balance to the colours often association with the popular images of Udham Singh. Black and White photos, black typewritten scripts of the Police reports are countered with pastel yellows and reds, solid textile print essays remind the visitor of seriousness of the exhibition.

Recounting all the names that Udham Singh was known for is also an admirable task, as it invites the visitor to consider that an itinerant Sikh could be a freedom fighter that was also called Frank Brasil. Finally referencing academic works and engaging with the commentariat make this exhibition a dialectic joy. Go and see it.

Viewing is by appointment, which only adds to the verbosity of the experience.

Pop Samiti Studio

Limehouse Town

646 Commercial Road

London

E14 7HA

http://www.popsamiti.org

Open every Friday, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 6pm.

Admission Free

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Violence, Memory, and the Dynamics of Transnational Youth Formations

Posted in Academic Journals by Pippa on October 9, 2012

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Violence, Memory, and the Dynamics of Transnational Youth Formations

Eds Kamal Arora, Duygu Gül & Michael Nijhawan

We invite submissions for a special issue of Sikh Formations that tackles the relationship between violence, memory and transnational youth formations. In recent years, we are witnessing a massive mobilization of youth not only in the streets of the Middle East, but globally, from Spain to Quebec, and London to Athens. Youth are engaged in forms of identity making in contexts of neoliberal capitalism, authoritarian states, and diasporic spaces. This special issue seeks to shed light on youth subjectivities and contemporary forms of social and political engagements through a transnational lens. We invite contributions that assess the burgeoning forms of transnational contours of youth formations, and reflect on new languages emerging in encounters with states, political regimes and other actors. As this issue is interdisciplinary and the focus is transnational, scholarly papers as well as creative works that focus on a wide variety of geographical localities, including a transnational and/or diasporic component are welcome.

Broadly, we welcome papers that:

  • theorize youth formations in relation to violence and memory, which might include social and political activism, social media, multiculturalism and the state, diaspora and transnationalism, gendered identities, security and migration, religion and secularism;
  • reflect on the specificity, flexibility and adaptability of the category of “youth” in each analyzed context by paying specific attention to the politics of categorization;
  • examine diasporic contexts and formation of other youth constellations, be they nationally or internationally defined.

We invite authors to submit papers that reflect multiple interdisciplinary perspectives, including scholarly papers as well as creative works such as non-fiction narrative, poetry, memoir and photographic essays. The deadline for abstracts is: December 10th, 2012. Detailed abstracts of 300-500 words should be e-mailed to youthfor@yorku.ca by December 10th, 2012. Once abstracts have been selected by the editorial team, authors are requested to submit their manuscripts by May 1st, 2013. Manuscripts for scholarly papers should follow the format provided on ‘Instructions for Authors’ page of the Sikh Formations website and be between 8000 to 10000 words, including all notes and references. Narrative pieces or creative essays should not exceed 2000 words. If you wish to have more information about this special issue, please contact us at youthfor@yorku.ca .

Guest editors Kamal Arora, Duygu Gül & Michael Nijhawan.

Call for papers: Gender and Justice in South Asia since 175

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on October 1, 2012

Wolfson College, University of Oxford, September 12-13, 2013

DEADLINE 31 DECEMBER 2012

Recent popular campaigns in South Asia designed to highlight and root out corruption at both the local and national level show that the subject of justice, fairness and equitable treatment, remain a pressing issue. South Asian women’s social, cultural, religious and economic position has also repeatedly been identified since the eighteenth century as an area particularly deserving of attention. This has led to a thriving women’s movement, as well as problematic colonial notions of eternally oppressed South Asian women that are still used as a symbol to justify a plethora of conservative viewpoints in the West.

This international and multidisciplinary conference will explore the manifold ways in which the ideas of gender and justice have been approached in South Asia and in the South Asian Diaspora since 1757. Its aim is to foster dialogue between scholars from different fields and to provide an historical dimension to contemporary issues and debates around the broad themes of gender, sexuality and justice. Papers which have a transnational and/or comparative focus between countries in South Asia and elsewhere in the world are particularly welcome.

Keynote Address:

Dr Joanna de Groot (University of York)

Provisionally confirmed speakers include:

*Professor Clare Anderson (University of Leicester) *Professor Uma Chakravarti (Miranda House) *Dr Esme Cleall (University of Sheffield)*Dr Stephen Legg (University of Nottingham) *Dr Andrea Major (University of Leeds) *Dr Anshu Malhotra (University of Delhi) * Professor Clare Midgley (Sheffield Hallam University) *Dr Kaveri Qureshi (University of Oxford) *Professor Janaki Nair (Jawaharlal Nehru University)

*Professor Shirin Rai (University of Warwick)

It is envisaged that the conference will result in one or more publications.

Please send an abstract of no more than 500 words and a one-page CV to daniel.grey@wolfson.ox.ac.uk by 31 December 2012. Notification of acceptance will be given before 31 January 2013.

Organiser(s):

Daniel Grey, Wolfson College Oxford, United Kingdom

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Special Issue, Journal of Refugee Studies

Posted in Academic Journals, Partition by Pippa on October 1, 2012

Some of you may be interested in a couple of articles in the current edition of Journal of Refugee Studies.

Special Issue: The Refugee in the Postwar World, 1945–1960

Guest Editors: Anna Holian and G. Daniel Cohen

Volume 25 Issue 3 September 2012

 

Cabeiri Debergh Robinson, ‘Too Much Nationality: Kashmiri Refugees, the South Asian Refugee Regime, and a Refugee State, 1947–1974’

Abstract

This article examines the development of a regional refugee regime through an examination of the international context in which ‘Kashmiri refugees’ emerged as rights-bearing political subjects. I distinguish between the refugee regime that was developing in Europe at the end of the Second World War and the refugee regime that was developing to handle the integration of Partition refugees into the new nation-states of Pakistan and India during the Partition of British colonial India in 1947. I also describe how the ‘Kashmiri refugee’ emerged as a distinct political subject within the South Asian refugee regime through treaties between India and Pakistan and provincial legal provisions, designated administrative practices by the national governments, and the eventual creation of a ‘refugee electorate’ in Azad Jammu and Kashmir. The constitution of a modern regional refugee regime that recognized refugees as inherently political subjects enables a critical perspective on the globalizing claims of the ‘international refugee regime’.

 

Tahir Naqvi, ‘Migration, Sacrifice and the Crisis of Muslim Nationalism’

Abstract

Drawing on oral histories and British, Indian, and Pakistani archives of the post-Partition era, this article considers the historical subjectivity of refugees to Pakistan who came from the minority-Muslim provinces of India. In contrast to Muslim refugees who arrived under the cover of a bilateral transfer of population, Pakistan’s leadership discouraged residents of the minority-Muslim provinces from leaving India. I trace how migrants (muhajirs) from the minority-Muslim provinces imagine their migration in terms of the theologically informed concept of ‘sacrifice’. I contend that the sacrificial imaginary mediates the rupture that Pakistan’s sovereignty created between membership and inclusion within the Muslim nation.

http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/current

Naming of Shadman Chowk, Lahore as Bhagat Singh Chowk welcomed in India

Posted in News/Information by Pippa on October 1, 2012

New Delhi, Eminent personalities and groups from India have welcomed the renaming of Shadman Chowk in Lahore-Pakistan to Bhagat Singh Chowk on the occasion of birth anniversary of the martyr. Eminent journalist and author of ‘Without Fear’, book on Bhagat Singh-Kuldip Nayar, Justice(Retd.) Rajinder Sachar, Editor of Bhagat Singh’s documents and author of several books in many Indian languages on Bhagat Singh-Prof. Chaman Lal from JNU, New Delhi, activists from Indo-Pak Dosti Manch, Pakistan India People’s Forum for Peace and Democracy(PIPFPD), National Forum of Forest People and Forest Workers(NFFPFW), People’s Saarc, Bhagat Singh’s family members, have welcomed the notification issued by Lahore officials to this effect as reported in Pakistan daily ‘Dawn’(Link attached).

Pakistan civil and political groups have been demanding the renaming of Chowk, which was the location, where Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and Sukhdev were actually hanged on 23rd March, 1931, as it was execution ground of Central Jail Lahore at that time. In 1961, the jail was demolished and new colony Shadman colony was set up and at execution ground Shadman Chowk was built. Civil society activists from both countries have been holding candle march at this location on every 23rd March and have many times themselves put up the signboard of ‘Bhagat Singh Chowk’. This year on 23rd March, Kuldip Nayar has extracted promise from former Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, whose party is ruling in Punjab (Pakistan) to get the chowk officially named as Bhagat Singh Chowk, that promised has been fulfilled on the birth anniversary of Bhagat Singh. Kuldip Nayar has complimented Nawaz Sharif and other Pakistani leaders for this gesture, strengthening Indo-Pak peace process further.

This year for the first time, Bhagat Singh’s birth anniversary was celebrated in Dayal Singh College hall in Lahore on 28th September by Pakistan Labour party and 23 more organizations, where Bhagat Singh was described as the representative of struggling [people of whole Asia. The organisers demanded to set up a museum in birthplace of Bhagat Singh in Chak no. 105, Lyalpur Bange in Faislabad district. Advocate Iqbal Virk, who is now occupant of Bhagat Singh’s birth house participated in the function and offered all cooperation in this regard.27 member Indian delegation, which included Bhagat Singh’s nephew Kiranjit sandhu and author of several books on Bhagat Singh-Prof. Chaman Lal, could not join the jointly planned anniversary due to non-clearance of visa till last day.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2012/20121001/world.htm#7

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