Punjab Research Group

Special Issue, Journal of Refugee Studies

Posted in Academic Journals, Partition by Pippa on October 1, 2012

Some of you may be interested in a couple of articles in the current edition of Journal of Refugee Studies.

Special Issue: The Refugee in the Postwar World, 1945–1960

Guest Editors: Anna Holian and G. Daniel Cohen

Volume 25 Issue 3 September 2012

 

Cabeiri Debergh Robinson, ‘Too Much Nationality: Kashmiri Refugees, the South Asian Refugee Regime, and a Refugee State, 1947–1974’

Abstract

This article examines the development of a regional refugee regime through an examination of the international context in which ‘Kashmiri refugees’ emerged as rights-bearing political subjects. I distinguish between the refugee regime that was developing in Europe at the end of the Second World War and the refugee regime that was developing to handle the integration of Partition refugees into the new nation-states of Pakistan and India during the Partition of British colonial India in 1947. I also describe how the ‘Kashmiri refugee’ emerged as a distinct political subject within the South Asian refugee regime through treaties between India and Pakistan and provincial legal provisions, designated administrative practices by the national governments, and the eventual creation of a ‘refugee electorate’ in Azad Jammu and Kashmir. The constitution of a modern regional refugee regime that recognized refugees as inherently political subjects enables a critical perspective on the globalizing claims of the ‘international refugee regime’.

 

Tahir Naqvi, ‘Migration, Sacrifice and the Crisis of Muslim Nationalism’

Abstract

Drawing on oral histories and British, Indian, and Pakistani archives of the post-Partition era, this article considers the historical subjectivity of refugees to Pakistan who came from the minority-Muslim provinces of India. In contrast to Muslim refugees who arrived under the cover of a bilateral transfer of population, Pakistan’s leadership discouraged residents of the minority-Muslim provinces from leaving India. I trace how migrants (muhajirs) from the minority-Muslim provinces imagine their migration in terms of the theologically informed concept of ‘sacrifice’. I contend that the sacrificial imaginary mediates the rupture that Pakistan’s sovereignty created between membership and inclusion within the Muslim nation.

http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/current

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