Punjab Research Group

“Punjab: Past, Present and Future,” Punjab Research Group Conference, 27 October, 2018 (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Posted in News/Information by rsmaan on October 26, 2018

DETAILED PROGRAMME

09.00- 09.15: Registration

09.15- 09.30: Welcome address: Prof. Pritam Singh, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford

09.30-11.15: Session I Religion and Punjab studies
Chair: Jaskiran Bhogal, PhD Candidate, London School of Economics, United Kingdom
09.30-09.55: Punjab and Sind Bank and the Creation of Sikh Heritage
Kanika Singh, Director, Centre for Writing & Communication, Ashoka University

09.55-10.20: Referendum 2020: A view from Punjab
Kiranpreet Kaur, PhD Student, Department of African Studies and Anthropology, University of Birmingham

10.20-10.45: The jama’at of Allah’s Friends: Maulana Allahyar’s reformist Movement and sacralising the space of the Armed Forces of Pakistan
Saadia Sumbal, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Forman Christian College University Lahore

10.45-11.15: Discussion

11.15-11.45: Tea/Coffee Break

11.45-01.30: Session II Land reforms, rural economy, politics and governance
Chair: Prof. Pritam Singh, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford

11.45-12.10: Killing the two birds with one stone? Land Reforms as Power Sustenance and Peasants’ Suppression Tool in the West Punjab
Mazhar Abbas, PhD Candidate1 and Lecturer2
1. World History, Shanghai University, China and
2. History and Pakistan Studies, Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan

12.10-12.35: The Quality of Employment in Rural Non-Farm Sector of Punjab
Anupama Uppal, Professor, Economics Department of Economics, Punjabi University, Patiala,
Punjab – India

12.35-13.00: Governing (In-) Security Practices in the Punjab Borderland
Raphaela Kormoll, PhD Candidate, School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University

13.00-13.30: Discussion
13.30-14.15: Lunch Break
14.15-14.30: Conference Announcements regarding Publications, Scholarships and Research Projects

14.30-16:15: Session III Gender studies
Chair: Dr. Pippa Virdee, Senior Lecturer, De Montfort University, Leicester

14:30-14:55: The role of East Punjabi women in textiles manufacturing – Sewing for success
Harminder Kaur Bhogal, Project Director of Community Education Academy of Leadership (CEAL), West Midlands, England

14:55-15:20: Christian lenses, Christian goals? Two centuries of western women’s reporting of Sikhs
Eleanor Nesbitt, Professor Emeritus, Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit, Centre for Education Studies, University of Warwick

15:20-15:45: Women freedom in Bahawalpur State and the Colonial Punjab
Samia Khalid, Assistant Professor at the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan

15.45- 16.15: Discussion

16.15-16.45: Tea/Coffee Break

16.45-17.20: Session IV History and art studies
Chair: Professor Iftikhar H. Malik, Bath Spa University

16.45-17.10: Heer Waris Shah: A Meme of Punjabiyat
Simple Kochar, PhD Candidate, Dept. of English, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar

17.10-17.20: Discussion

17.20-17.40: Deliberation on/Announcement of Best Presenter Award

17.40-18.00: Vote of Thanks
Prof. Pritam Singh, Conference Director

Registration: Please register for the event at http://www.punjabresearchgroup.eventbrite.com (or https://tinyurl.com/yb23pw2o)

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“Punjab: Past, Present and Future,” Punjab Research Group Conference, 27 October, 2018

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 25, 2018

DETAILED PROGRAMME

09.00- 09.15:        Registration

09.15- 09.30:         Welcome address: Pritam Singh, Visiting Professor, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford

09.30-11.15:         Session I     Religion and Punjab studies  Chair: Jaskiran Bhogal, PhD Candidate, London School of Economics, United Kingdom

09.30-09.55:         Punjab and Sind Bank and the Creation of Sikh Heritage Kanika Singh, Director, Centre for Writing & Communication, Ashoka University

09.55-10.20:         Referendum 2020: A view from Punjab Kiranpreet Kaur, PhD Student, Department of African Studies and Anthropology, University of Birmingham

10.20-10.45:         The jama’at of Allah’s Friends: Maulana Allahyar’s reformist Movement and sacralising the space of the Armed Forces of Pakistan Saadia Sumbal, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Forman Christian College University Lahore

10.45-11.15:         Discussion

11.15-11.45:         Tea/Coffee Break

11.45-01.30:         Session II    Land reforms, rural economy, politics and governance Chair: Pritam Singh, Visiting Professor, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford                  

11.45-12.10:         Killing the two birds with one stone? Land Reforms as Power Sustenance and Peasants’ Suppression Tool in the West Punjab Mazhar Abbas, PhD Candidate (World History, Shanghai University, China) and and Lecturer (History and Pakistan Studies, Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan)

12.10-12.35:         The Quality of Employment in Rural Non-Farm Sector of Punjab Anupama Uppal, Professor, Economics Department of Economics, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab – India

12.35-13.00:         Governing (In-) Security Practices in the Punjab Borderland 

Raphaela Kormoll, PhD Candidate, School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University 

13.00-13.30:         Discussion

13.30-14.15:         Lunch Break

14.15-14.30:         Conference Announcements regarding Publications, Scholarships and Research Projects

14.30-16:15:         Session III Gender studies   Chair: Dr. Pippa Virdee, Senior Lecturer, De Montfort University, Leicester

14:30-14:55:         The role of East Punjabi women in textiles manufacturing – Sewing for success  Harminder Kaur Bhogal, Project Director of Community Education Academy of Leadership (CEAL), West Midlands, England

14:55-15:20:         Christian lenses, Christian goals: two centuries of western women’s reporting of Sikhs Eleanor Nesbitt, Professor Emeritus, Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit, Centre for Education Studies, University of Warwick

15:20-15:45:   Women Freedom in Bahawalpur State and the Colonial Punjab, Samia Khalid, Assistant Professor at the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan 

15.45- 16.15:        Discussion

16.15-16.45:         Tea/Coffee Break

16.45-17.20:         Session IV  History and art studies Chair: Professor Iftikhar H. Malik, Bath Spa University

 16.45-17.10:         Heer Waris Shah: A Meme of Punjabiyat Simple Kochar, PhD Candidate, Dept. of English, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar

17.10-17.20:         Discussion   

17.20-17.40:         Deliberation on/Announcement of Best Presenter Award

17.40-18.00:         Vote of Thanks  Prof. Pritam Singh, Conference Director

Please register via: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/punjab-past-present-and-future-punjab-research-group-conference-2018-tickets-46647517982 

PRG Conference Abstracts 27 October 2018

cfp: ‘Punjab: Past, Present, Future’ Punjab Research Group Conference, October 27, 2018 (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Posted in News/Information by rsmaan on June 3, 2018

The Punjab Research Group has been hosting conferences at least twice a year since 1984 and was established as an inclusive and all-embracing forum to provide a platform for discussion and debate on issues pertaining to East and West Punjab as well as the Punjabi diaspora. During the past 34 years, the PRG has provided space for academics to interact with each other regardless of territorial or disciplinary boundaries. This is especially important given the often-strained relationship between India and Pakistan, which has prevented discussion and dialogue between scholars of East and West Punjab.

Our second conference for 2018 will be held as a one-day event on 27th October at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. We welcome submissions from scholars, academics, young researchers, journalists, artists, and activists for an inter-disciplinary discussion focusing on the theme of ‘Punjab: Past, Present and Future’.

Speakers are invited to give paper-presentations/performances that can cover a broad range of content, including, but not limited to: history, philosophy, politics, gender, religion, environmental studies, economics, diaspora issues, linguistics, literature, poetry, arts, and culture.

We particularly welcome proposals exploring the genesis of Punjab, intersections between the ‘3 Punjabs’, going beyond the 1947 borders: to deepen our perspective on the ‘connected histories’, and to envision interrelated futures, of the region.

Please submit abstracts (200 words) and CV to Raj (RS Mann) at punjabresearchgroup@gmail.com by 30th June 2018. Submissions from grad/postgraduate students are encouraged. Best Presenter Award will be presented to a doctoral student whose presentation is judged to be the best from amongst all the full time doctoral student presentations. The Award includes cash and a certificate.

If you would like to register as a guest for this event, please book a ticket using our online form at (https://tinyurl.com/yb23pw2o). The registration fee is £10 per person.

We look forward to seeing you in Oxford soon!

Posted in News/Information by rsmaan on March 30, 2018

Detailed programme: Punjab Research Group Conference 31 March 2018

Saturday, March 31, 2018

DETAILED PROGRAMME

09.30- 09.45:         Registration

09.45- 10.00:         Welcome Address: Prof. Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford.

10.00-11.30:          Session I     Language and music  

Chair: Jaskiran Bhogal, London School of Economics, United Kingdom

10.00 – 10.25:       Breaking Barriers: Role of Punjabipedia in Reaching out to Global Readers of Punjabi Language

Dr. Rajwinder Singh1 and Dr. Jasvir Kaur2,  1. Assistant Professor, Department of English, Punjabi University Patiala and 2. Assistant Professor, Department of Literary Studies, Punjabi University Patiala

10.25-10.50:        

10.50-11.30:          Discussion

11.30-11.50:          Coffee Break

11.50-13.20:          Session II    Gender studies  

Chair: Dr. Meena Dhanda, University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom                   

11.50-12.15:          Punjab’s modernity still leaving behind menstruation as an un-talked taboo topic.

Aleena Qaiser, Forman Christian College, Lahore

12.15-12.40:          Nevertheless She Persists

Simi Singh, Universty of British Columbia, Vancouver

 12.40-13.20:          Discussion

13.20-14.00:          Lunch Break

14.00-14.15:          Conference Announcements regarding Publications, Scholarships and Research Projects

14.15-15:45:         Session III Social and art studies   

 Chair: Prof. Eleanor Nesbitt, University of Warwick, United Kingdom

 14:15-14:40:         British Punjab 1849-58: A Study in Imperialism

 Fozia Umar, PhD Candidate, Department of History, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad and Visiting Fellow, Royal Holloway University of London

14:40-15:05:        Scheduled Castes Welfare in Punjab: Exploring the Extent of Awareness about Government Schemes
Dr. Lakhvir Singh, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, Punjabi University Patiala

15.05- 15.45: Discussion

15.45-16.05: Coffee Break

16.05-16.50: Session IV History and study of religions

Chair: Prabhsharandeep Singh, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

16.05-16.30: Journey of Jamia Khair Ul Madaris from Jalandhar, India, to Multan, Pakistan (1931-1951)
Fakhar Bilal, PhD Candidate, Department of History, Royal Holloway University of London

16.30-16.50:          Discussion 

16.50-17.05:         Deliberation on/Announcement of Best Presenter Award

17.05-17.30:          Coffee Break

17.30-18.30:          1984-When the sun didn’t rise (film screening)

Teenaa Kaur Pasricha, Independent Film Maker

We would expect everyone in the audience to make a voluntary contribution of atleast £3 to this which goes to the film maker Teenaa Kaur Pasricha.

18.30-19.00:         Discussion and interaction with the film maker Teenaa Kaur Pasricha, Independent Film Maker

19.00-19.15:         Vote of Thanks

                            

 

A small world in a faraway land

Posted in News/Information by rsmaan on February 18, 2018

A small world in a faraway land

(this article is also available at http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/spectrum/a-small-world-in-a-faraway-land/544596.html)

Spectrum

Posted at: Feb 18, 2018, 1:30 AM; last updated: Feb 18, 2018, 1:30 AM (IST)
A small world in a faraway land
The history of Sikh heritage in Canada boasts of values of community living. It tells about Punjabi immigrants who moved to Paldi and Abbotsford and painted strokes of inherited culture

Rishi Singh

The Sikhs who first stepped on the western-Canadian soil were on their way to attend commemoration of Queen Victoria of England Diamond Jubilee in 1897. These soldiers were followed by more Sikh soldiers who travelled through Canada for the celebrations of the Kind Edward VII in 1902. The number of Sikh settlers began to rise, especially, 1904 onwards. The ‘white community’ thought that the Sikhs were getting better jobs and this lead to racial tensions. Realising the challenges, Sikhs organised themselves socially and politically and formed Khalsa Diwan Society in 1907. It was during this time that the first gurdwara was established at West 2nd Avenue, Vancouver.

In an attempt to dishearten South Asians from settling down in Canada, the then Canadian government introduced the infamous “continuous journey” regulation in 1908. The regulation put forward a condition that only those who reached Canadian ports after travelling continuously from their country would be allowed to land on its soil. In the year 1914, a large number of passengers, majority of them Sikhs, sailed to Canada on the ship Komagata Maru were refused entry under the new law. To make matters worse, women and children under 18 were not permitted to come along with men to Canada until 1920s, when the law changed and families began moving in.

A high engagement with the democratic institution of the nation prompted the Sikhs, led by Khalsa Diwan Society, to ask for the right to vote. In 1945, war veterans from the World Wars were granted the right to cast votes in the provincial elections. In 1947-48, the Canadians from South Asian descent were allowed to vote both in provincial and federal elections. Thus, gaining full rights of a Canadian citizen.

Paldi — When a town became home

In Western Canada, the Sikh communities began prospering in cities like Duncan, Victoria, Vancouver, Abbotsford and Mission. Soon a sawmill town was established by Mayo Singh, a Sikh, who named the town Paldi after his native place Paldi in Hoshiarpur. In 1916, he went to Cowichan Valley seeking better source of timber and an appropriate site for establishing a sawmill. Slowly and steadily, the area around his sawmill began to grow like a town. Many workers, who were Japanese, South Asian, Chinese and whites began to settle there. The place had a Gurdwara, company store, post office and a Japanese community hall. As Paldi prospered, the place became a home away from home for many families. In tandem with the Sikh principles, Mayo Singh shared his earnings with the Duncan community. His donations to the Duncan hospitals are still talked about and appreciated. The sawmill stopped working in 1945 and that slowly put an end to the community living that saw amalgamation of several cultures in Canada.

Another fascinating fact that takes one to the golden days of Paldi is the making of a school.

In 1920, the first school in Paldi was built on a hill amidst huge stumps and debris of a former logging area, as mentioned by Carolyn Prellwitz in her article in Cowichan Valley Citizen. At the time when Canada celebrated its 150th year of existence, the one-room school at Paldi became symbolic of diversity and inclusion. Carolyn informs that all building material for the school was donated by the Mayo Lumber Company. Parents and others provided the labour and other equipment. The piano was personally given by Mayo Singh. The school photographs from the 1920s to 1960s featured Sikhs, Japanese, Chinese and Caucasian students, demonstrating rich diversity at Paldi.

The once-upon-a-time town of Paldi has disappeared, but what remains there is a Gurdwara Sahib. The gurdwara building has symbolic prakash of Guru Granth Sahib on the upper floor. The ground floor has a room with some old images that are put on the wall, pointing to the glorious days of Paldi. An image shows certificate of honours given to Mayo Singh by the government of Canada. There is an image of Mayo Singh meeting Jawaharlal Nehru, the then Indian Prime Minister of India, on his visit to Canada.

Abbotsford — Footprints of history

Nearly an hour from Vancouver, on the South Fraser Way, in the city of Abbotsford is located a Canadian Heritage Site, a gurdwara, known as Gur Sikh Temple. Soon after moving to Canada, I was fortunate to engage and work with the Fraser Valley Sikh community on a Canadian Sikh Heritage project that is the Gur Sikh Temple.

The site of the gurdwara opened in the year 1912 with support from Khalsa Diwan Society. As per the newspaper reports then, during the inauguration of the Gurdwara Sahib, a large number of Sikhs and non-Sikhs joined in the congregation. There are two floors on the gurdwara — the second floor has the prakash of Sri Guru Granth Sahib and the ground floor has a kitchen. Sunder Singh Thandi and Arjan Singh were instrumental in the making of the gurdwara. The one-acre land was bought by them adjacent to the mill, where 50 Sikhs worked. The owner of the Trethway Lumber Company donated the lumber for the gurdwara. It took Sikh community three years, beginning from 1908, to construct the gurdwara that formally opened in 1912.

In 2002, Khalsa Diwan Society asked the Historic Sites and Monuments Board to consider the gurdwara for National Historic Site status. In July 2002, the gurdwara received the recognition. Khalsa Diwan Society got the gurdwara building restored and reopened in 2007. The upper floor has prakash of Guru Granth Sahib. Currently, ground floor is used as exhibition space. The exterior of the Gurdwara Sahib has a gabbed roof. There are sculptures of Bhai Kanhaiya and injured soldiers being served water by him in the gardens of the Gurdwara premises. The exhibitions and sculptures make visitors curious about the Sikh history.

The teaching of tenth Guru of Sikhs, Gobind Singh, Manaski Jaat Sabhe eke Paichanbo recognises all mankind as a single race of humanity. It connects with the Canadian core values of equality and respect for cultural differences. Embracing this ethos, the Sikh community has played an important role in enriching the country’s institutions with its contributions. Canada is marching ahead, but at the same time is not forgetting its historic defining moments. It is rather preserving, conserving and sharing them with all. Those visiting Canada must make an effort to include Paldi and Abbotsford in their itinerary to experience the feel of Punjab while away from Punjab and to celebrate Canadian Sikhs’ glorious heritage in faraway lands.

cfp: ‘Punjab: Past, Present, Future’ Punjab Research Group Conference, March 31, 2018 (Oxford)

Posted in News/Information by rsmaan on February 1, 2018

The Punjab Research Group has been hosting conferences at least twice a year since 1984, and was established as an inclusive and all-embracing forum to provide a platform for discussion and debate on issues pertaining to East and West Punjab as well as the Punjabi diaspora. During the past 34 years, the PRG has provided space for academics to interact with each other regardless of territorial or disciplinary boundaries. This is especially important given the often-strained relationship between India and Pakistan, which has prevented discussion and dialogue between scholars of East and West Punjab.

Our first conference for 2018 will be held as a one-day event on 31st March in Oxford. We welcome submissions from scholars, academics, young researchers, journalists, artists, and activists for an inter-disciplinary discussion focusing on the theme of ‘Punjab: Past, Present and Future’.

Speakers are invited to give paper-presentations/performances that can cover a broad range of content, including, but not limited to: history, philosophy, politics, gender, religion, environmental studies, economics, diaspora issues, linguistics, literature, poetry, arts, and culture.

We particularly welcome proposals exploring the genesis of Punjab, intersections between the ‘3 Punjabs’, going beyond the 1947 borders: to deepen our perspective on the ‘connected histories’, and to envision interrelated futures, of the region.

Please submit abstracts (200 words) and CV to Raj (RS Mann) at punjabresearchgroup@gmail.com by 15th February 2018. Submissions from grad/postgraduate students are encouraged.

If you would like to register as a guest for this event, please book a ticket using our online form at (https://tinyurl.com/y93n4ncd). The registration fee is £10 per person. There is no registration fee for kids under 16 when accompanied with fee paying elders.

(more…)

PRG conference, 25 March 2017, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford.

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on March 21, 2017

We are delighted to share with you the programme for the upcoming PRG conference on Saturday, 25 March 2017, at the Oxford Brookes University, Oxford.

Please find attached the PRG PROGRAM Handbook 25 March 2017 and Programme Outline PRG 25 March 2017 containing the details of the papers to be presented and other relevant information. The booking fee for all conference guests and speakers is £10 per person. The fee can be paid at the time of registration using following modes:

1. International speakers: CASH only
2. UK speakers: Cash or cheque. The cheque should be payable to ‘Prof Eleanor Nesbitt Punjab Research Group Account’.

You are very welcome to forward this on to any friends who you think might also be interested in attending as a guest. If you would like to book a place for the day, please complete the guest registration form online as soon as possible at Registration

We would also encourage you to use the above link to spread the word about the conference on social media and elsewhere.

Looking forward to meeting you on the 25th!

Best wishes,
Raj
(on behalf of the PRG)

R Mann
Research Degree Student
Oxford Brookes University
Oxford, United Kingdom

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cfp: ‘Punjab: Past, Present, Future’ Punjab Research Group Conference, March 25, 2017

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on January 31, 2017

The Punjab Research Group has been hosting conferences at least twice a year since 1984, and was established as an inclusive and all-embracing forum to provide a platform for discussion and debate on issues pertaining to East and West Punjab as well as the Punjabi diaspora. During the past 33 years, the PRG has provided space for academics to interact with each other regardless of territorial or disciplinary boundaries. This is especially important given the often-strained relationship between India and Pakistan, which has prevented discussion and dialogue between scholars of East and West Punjab.

Our first conference for 2017 will be held as a one-day event on 25th March in Oxford. We welcome submissions from scholars, academics, young researchers, journalists, artists, and activists for an inter-disciplinary discussion focusing on the theme of ‘Punjab: Past, Present and Future’.

Speakers are invited to give paper-presentations/performances that can cover a broad range of content, including, but not limited to: history, philosophy, politics, gender, religion, environmental studies, economics, diaspora issues, linguistics, literature, poetry, arts, and culture.

We particularly welcome proposals exploring the genesis of Punjab, intersections between the ‘3 Punjabs’, going beyond the 1947 borders: to deepen our perspective on the ‘connected histories’, and to envision interrelated futures, of the region.

Please send 200-word abstracts and expressions of interest to R.S.Mann, Nadia Singh and Geeta Sinha at punjabresearchgroup@gmail.com by 17th February 2017.

Notification of Acceptance: 25th February 2017
If you would like to register as a guest for this event, please book a ticket using our

online form: http://www.punjabresearchgroup.eventbrite.com
We look forward to seeing you in Oxford soon!

‘Punjab: Past, Present, Future’ : Punjab Research Group Conference, 2016

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 29, 2016

Please the updated programme for the PRG conference taking place today.

Description

The Punjab Research Group has been hosting conferences at least twice a year since 1984, and was established as an inclusive and all- embracing forum for discussion and debate on issues pertaining to East and West Punjab as well as the Punjabi diaspora. During the past 32 years, the PRG has provided space for academics to interact with each other regardless of territorial or disciplinary boundaries. This is especially important given the strained relationship between India and Pakistan, which has prevented discussion and dialogue between scholars of East and West Punjab.

Our second conference for 2016 will be held as a one-day event on 29 October in Oxford. We are pleased to welcome academics, young researchers, journalists, artists and activists from across the globe for an inter-disciplinary discussion focusing on the theme of ‘Punjab: Past, Present and Future’.

PROGRAMME OUTLINE

09.00- 09.30:        Registration

09.30- 09.45:        Welcome Address: Prof. Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford.

09.45 -11.15:        Session I    Colonial Punjab: Multiple Facets

Chair:         Prof. Iftikhar Malik, Bath Spa University

09.45 – 10.05:       The Martial Race Theory & The Self-Identification of Sikh Soldiers in World War One

                              Amrit Kaur Lohia, Musician and MA History,

                              SOAS, University of London

10.05-10.25:         Mule-breeding in the colonial Punjab: A Frustrated Enterprise

                              Prof. William G. Clarence-Smith, SOAS, University of London

10.25-10.45:         Charhdee Kala: Akali Morchas, Indian Nationalism, and the Politics of Selfhood

                              Avinash Singh, Independent Researcher, USA

10.45-11.15:         Discussion

11.15-11.30:         Coffee Break

11.30-12.40:         Session II   Cultures: Material and Literary

Chair:                  Prof. Eleanor Nesbitt, Professor Emerita,

                           University of Warwick

11.30-11.50:         Sikh Interpretations of the Mughal Shalamar Garden in Lahore

                             Dr. Nadhra Shahbaz Naeem Khan, Assistant Professor, Lahore University of Management            Sciences

11.50 -12.10:        Political Consciousness of Punjabi Poetry of the post-1990s

                             Amandeep Kaur, PhD Candidate, Panjab University, Chandigarh

12.10 -12.40:        Discussion

12.40 -13.30:        Lunch Break

13.30-14.00:         Conference Announcements regarding Publications, Scholarships and Research Projects

14.00-15.10:         Session III          Postcolonial Punjab: Economic Trajectories

Chair:                     Dr. Navtej Purewal, Deputy Director, SOAS South Asia Institute

14:00-14:20:          Punjab: The Long Road to Social Protection

                               Nadia Singh, PhD Candidate, Oxford Brookes University

14:20-14:40          Merchant’s Capital in Punjab’s Agriculture: Reflections on Farmer-Arhtia Relations

                              Shreya Sinha, PhD Candidate, SOAS, University of London

14.40-15.10:         Discussion

15.10-15.30:         Coffee Break

15.30-16.40:         Session IV  Postcolonial Punjab: Political Trajectories

Chair:                     Dr. Meena Dhanda, Reader, University of Wolverhampton

15.30-15.50:         The Migrant, Migrant-in-Waiting and the Non-Migrant: Diverse Trajectories of Social        Mobility

                             Sugandha Nagpal, PhD Candidate, University of East Anglia

15.50-16.10:          Pakistan and the Christians: Creating a Sense of Belonging

                              Dr. Yaqoob Bangash, IT University of the Punjab, Lahore

16:10-16:40          Discussion

16.40-17.00:         Deliberation on/Announcement of Best Presenter Award

17.00-17.45:         Open Session including Poetry and Music

17.45-18.00          Note of Thanks

PRG conference, Saturday, 29 October, Wolfson College, Oxford

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 26, 2016

Attached is the programme for the upcoming PRG conference on Saturday, 29 October, at Wolfson College, Oxford.

You are very welcome to forward this on to any friends who you think might also be interested in attending as a guest. If you would like to book a place for the day, please complete the guest registration form online as soon as possible at :

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/punjab-past-present-future-punjab-research-group-conference-2016-tickets-27455044778

Full Programme:programme-outline-prg-22-october-2016

Abstracts: prg-conference-abstracts_-22-october-2016

We would also encourage you to use the above link to spread the word about the conference on social media and elsewhere.

Looking forward to meeting you on the 29th!

Best wishes,
Radha
on behalf of the PRG

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Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Posted in Events, News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on March 27, 2015

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Poetry is engrained in every aspect of the lives, stories, music, politics, philosophy, faith and culture of Punjabis. A number of us are gathering together to explore Punjabi poetry through time (and through this, a history of Punjab), meeting once a month at SOAS.

Starting with Baba Farid (12th century) through to Najm Hosain Syed and Amarjit Chandan writing today, we will focus in each session, on one or two poets; reading their poetry, listening to it being sung, and discussing it along with the historical/political/ philosophical context. We hope to have leading Punjabi poet Amarjit Chandan joining us for most of the sessions, sharing his knowledge, along with other guest writers/scholars/singers.

We welcome those of all ages and levels, those with knowledge, passion and interest that can be shared and developed, but also those who are new to Punjabi poetry/literature, who may not read Gurmukhi/Shahmukhi or be proficient in Punjabi, but want to listen and explore – we especially encourage you to join us.

For further information please contact ssai@soas.ac.uk.

Forthcoming Events

Session 2: Baba Nanak

7 April 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 3: Ravidas and Kabir

5 May 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 4: Guru Gobind Singh

9 June 2015, Brunei Gallery, B104, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 5: Sultan Bahu and Bulleh Shah

7 July 2015, Brunei Gallery, B102, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 6: Waris Shah & Damoodar (Heer)

4 August 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Posted in Events, News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 19, 2015

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Poetry is engrained in every aspect of the lives, stories, music, politics, philosophy, faith and culture of Punjabis. A number of us are gathering together to explore Punjabi poetry through time (and through this, a history of Punjab), meeting once a month at SOAS.

Starting with Baba Farid (12th century) through to Najm Hosain Syed and Amarjit Chandan writing today, we will focus in each session, on one or two poets; reading their poetry, listening to it being sung, and discussing it along with the historical/political/ philosophical context. We hope to have leading Punjabi poet Amarjit Chandan joining us for most of the sessions, sharing his knowledge, along with other guest writers/scholars/singers.

We welcome those of all ages and levels, those with knowledge, passion and interest that can be shared and developed, but also those who are new to Punjabi poetry/literature, who may not read Gurmukhi/Shahmukhi or be proficient in Punjabi, but want to listen and explore – we especially encourage you to join us.

The first session is on Monday 9th March 2015, 6-8 pm at SOAS Russell Square (Room T102) and after that, on the first Monday of every month.

Session 1 (Monday March 9th):                  Baba Farid and Shah Hussain

Session 2 (Monday April 6th):                   Guru Nanak

Session 3 (Monday May 4th):                     Sant Ravidas and Kabir

Session 4 (Monday June 1st):                   Guru Gobind Singh

Session 5 (Monday July 6th):                   Sultan Bahu and Bulleh Shah

Session 6 (Monday August 3rd):         Waris Shah and Damoodar (Heer)

Future sessions (open to suggestions): Women’s folk songs, Peero, Amrita Pritam, Shiv Kumar Batalvi, Paash and Lal Singh Dil, Sant Ram Udasi, Gurdas Ram Alam, Najm Hosain Syed, Amarjit Chandan

For more information, email sangat.punjab@gmail.com

Sangat-Dialog.Punjab 2015

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