Punjab Research Group

THAAP Talk Series: People’s History of Pakistan

Posted in Events by Pippa on March 27, 2015

23rd THAAP Talk by Mr. Tahir Mehdi

Mr. Tahir Mehdi has kindly agreed to give the 23rd THAAP Talk on

“GAWALAY OF LAHORE: A history of resistance against land grabbers and corporate onslaught”

SATURDAY, APRIL 04, 2015 at 6 pm, 43-G, Gulberg-III, Lahore, Pakistan

Presentation:

“Gawalay of Lahore: A history of resistance against land grabbers and corporate onslaught”

Speaker: Mr. Tahir Mehdi

Chairperson: Prof. Dr. Anis A. Siddiqi

The talk is about the untold story of peri-urban milk entrepreneurs of Lahore who fought against much more powerful and highly sophisticated adversaries in market, in ‘battlefield’ and in courts of law and survived.

Mr. Tahir Mehdi works at Punjab Lok Sujag, an advocacy and research organization that aims to put ‘local issues high on global agenda’. He is also a part-time journalist writing mostly for dawn.com

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cfp: SOAS South Asia Institute and Punjab Research Group

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on March 27, 2015

The Politics of the Social and Beyond: Hegemonies, Resistances, and Negotiations

Date: 27 June 2015 at 10:00 AM

Venue: B 104, Brunei Gallery, SOAS, University of London

Call for Papers

A one-day workshop hosted by the SOAS South Asia Institute, University of London

“The Politics of the Social and Beyond: Hegemonies, Resistances, and Negotiations”.

The SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI) is pleased to announce a call for papers for the next Punjab Research Group meeting in June. The SSAI welcomes this opportunity to host the bi-annual PRG meeting and is supporting a number of Punjab-related initiatives, including teaching and research as well as the hosting of a monthly poetry/study group Sangat: Dialog Punjab open to the public.

The realm of the social is often viewed primarily through relations and interactions which exist alongside or even in spite of wider political, historical and economic processes. This one-day workshop aims to bring together a number of papers which focus on the ways in which the social informs and is informed by these broader processes by focusing upon how domination, governance, resistance, and negotiation have taken place over time.

Paper presenters are invited to submit expressions of interest, titles, and abstracts of 200 words. While the theme is a broadly stated one on the politics of the social, this can be interpreted in a plethora of ways. The invitation to submit titles and abstracts is extended to all disciplines, and the intention is that the day will result in an inter-disciplinary dialogue.

This PRG meeting will be co-organised by Navtej Purewal (SOAS) and Pippa Virdee (De Montfort University).

Please send 200 word abstracts, titles, and expressions of interest by May 1st to ssai@soas.ac.uk.

Registration:

This workshop will charge a minimal fee towards lunch.

Further information: http://www.soas.ac.uk/south-asia-institute/events/

State Formation and the Establishment of Non-Muslim Hegemony Post-Mughal 19th-century Punjab by Rishi Singh

Posted in New Publications by Pippa on March 27, 2015

rishi singhState Formation and the Establishment of Non-Muslim Hegemony Post-Mughal 19th-century Punjab by Rishi Singh

This book explores one of the most crucial factors leading to the non-Islamic paradigm in the political and social fabric of Punjab—the emergence of a Sikh ‘space’ from the time of advent of the gurus.

It examines the Punjab state under Maharaja Ranjit Singh and his rightful domination over the majority Muslim subjects.

The conversion of Punjabis both from Hindu and Muslim backgrounds to Sikhism began to create problems for the Muslim elites in Punjab, even though Muslim and Sikh leaderships engaged with each other. The book traces how Ranjit Singh derived legitimacy from Muslim subjects in five crucial areas of governance: religion, justice, army, agrarian policy and the formation of new Muslim elites.

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Posted in Events, News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on March 27, 2015

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Poetry is engrained in every aspect of the lives, stories, music, politics, philosophy, faith and culture of Punjabis. A number of us are gathering together to explore Punjabi poetry through time (and through this, a history of Punjab), meeting once a month at SOAS.

Starting with Baba Farid (12th century) through to Najm Hosain Syed and Amarjit Chandan writing today, we will focus in each session, on one or two poets; reading their poetry, listening to it being sung, and discussing it along with the historical/political/ philosophical context. We hope to have leading Punjabi poet Amarjit Chandan joining us for most of the sessions, sharing his knowledge, along with other guest writers/scholars/singers.

We welcome those of all ages and levels, those with knowledge, passion and interest that can be shared and developed, but also those who are new to Punjabi poetry/literature, who may not read Gurmukhi/Shahmukhi or be proficient in Punjabi, but want to listen and explore – we especially encourage you to join us.

For further information please contact ssai@soas.ac.uk.

Forthcoming Events

Session 2: Baba Nanak

7 April 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 3: Ravidas and Kabir

5 May 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 4: Guru Gobind Singh

9 June 2015, Brunei Gallery, B104, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 5: Sultan Bahu and Bulleh Shah

7 July 2015, Brunei Gallery, B102, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 6: Waris Shah & Damoodar (Heer)

4 August 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Posted in Events, News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 19, 2015

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Poetry is engrained in every aspect of the lives, stories, music, politics, philosophy, faith and culture of Punjabis. A number of us are gathering together to explore Punjabi poetry through time (and through this, a history of Punjab), meeting once a month at SOAS.

Starting with Baba Farid (12th century) through to Najm Hosain Syed and Amarjit Chandan writing today, we will focus in each session, on one or two poets; reading their poetry, listening to it being sung, and discussing it along with the historical/political/ philosophical context. We hope to have leading Punjabi poet Amarjit Chandan joining us for most of the sessions, sharing his knowledge, along with other guest writers/scholars/singers.

We welcome those of all ages and levels, those with knowledge, passion and interest that can be shared and developed, but also those who are new to Punjabi poetry/literature, who may not read Gurmukhi/Shahmukhi or be proficient in Punjabi, but want to listen and explore – we especially encourage you to join us.

The first session is on Monday 9th March 2015, 6-8 pm at SOAS Russell Square (Room T102) and after that, on the first Monday of every month.

Session 1 (Monday March 9th):                  Baba Farid and Shah Hussain

Session 2 (Monday April 6th):                   Guru Nanak

Session 3 (Monday May 4th):                     Sant Ravidas and Kabir

Session 4 (Monday June 1st):                   Guru Gobind Singh

Session 5 (Monday July 6th):                   Sultan Bahu and Bulleh Shah

Session 6 (Monday August 3rd):         Waris Shah and Damoodar (Heer)

Future sessions (open to suggestions): Women’s folk songs, Peero, Amrita Pritam, Shiv Kumar Batalvi, Paash and Lal Singh Dil, Sant Ram Udasi, Gurdas Ram Alam, Najm Hosain Syed, Amarjit Chandan

For more information, email sangat.punjab@gmail.com

Sangat-Dialog.Punjab 2015

cfp: International Sikh Research Conference (ISRC)

Posted in Conferences, Events by Pippa on February 16, 2015

We are pleased to announce the call for papers (C4p) and registrations for the second International Sikh Research Conference (ISRC). The conference will take place at the prestigious University of Warwick on the 28 June 2015.

The second conference draws on the unprecedented success of the first ISRC, 2014 by bringing together academics, scholars and researchers and to encourage a spirit of collaboration within international Sikh studies academia.

Scholars, researchers and academics are encouraged to submit a paper which highlights research on any of the following themes: Musicology, History, Philosophy, Scripture, Diaspora, Identity, and Politics.

The call for papers for the second Sikh Research Conference is now live at http://www.sikhconference.co.uk.
See attachment for further details: Call for Papers
Regards
Gurinder Singh Mann
http://www.sikhscholar.co.uk

Lahore Literary Festival: 2015

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on February 15, 2015
Tagged with: , , ,

International Conference on “1947 : RETHINKING” 13th – 14th March, 2015

Posted in Conferences, Partition by Pippa on February 15, 2015

1947: Rethinking

Organised by Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

For participation and further details please contact:-

Director of the Conference:

Prof. Amarjit Singh, Chairman, Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (Haryana) (M) – 098121-84925

Landline No (s) – 01744-238410, 238196, 238679, Extn. 2558 & 2559 (Office)

 

Organizing Secretaries:

Dr. Nandini Bashistha, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 09729074479

Mr. Dharamveer Saini, Assistant Professor, Department of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 097288-61900

 

Email:

chairperson.history@kuk.ac.in

amarjitsingh_45@yahoo.co.in

Please attached for full details:Concept Note-1, Information regarding International Conference-1

Memorialising a forgotten chapter: Komagata Maru – IIT Kharagpur

Posted in Events, Film by Pippa on February 15, 2015
Tagged with:

In the name of Punjabiyyat

Posted in Articles, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 15, 2015

In the name of Punjabiyyat by Mahmood Awan, TNS

In terms of Punjabi nationality, the literature produced by Punjabis is a multi-linguistic phenomenon; be it in Punjabi, English or any other language. Some of these writers may not identify themselves as Punjabis and this sensibility may be only reflected in their writings.

When Gujranwala born, British Pakistani novelist Nadeem Aslam quotes couplets of a rather unknown rural Punjabi Poet Abid Tamimi in his novel Maps for lost lovers (2004), he is subconsciously establishing his native connectivity. He furthers this theme in his latest novel The Blind Man’s Garden (2013) by creating a whole fictional town named Heer (inspired by Waris Shah’s legend) and proudly claims that  all his future novels will be set in this Punjabi town.

When Los Angeles born, Pakistani American Daniyal Mueenuddin’s book of short stories In Other Rooms, Other Wonders (2009) opens with a Punjabi proverb in Punjabi text, he is presumably asserting his Punjabi identity. More so, when one of his short story protagonists on watching a chestnut seller boy in the freezing cold of Paris pulls his American girlfriend closer and whispers: “He is one of mine, from Pakistan, from Punjab.”

Mulk Raj Anand (1905-2004) was our first global offering. Recipient of the prestigious Lenin Peace Prize, he was co-founder of the Progressive Writers’ Movement in the undivided India. He was born in Peshawar to a Sikh mother from Sialkot and a Hindu father from Amritsar. He studied philosophy at Cambridge University where he had gone on the behest of Allama Iqbal and received his PhD from University College London in 1929. He was close friends with George Orwell, TS Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Aldous Huxley, Herbert Read and EM Forster. His best-known novel Untouchable (1935) was issued as a Penguin Modern Classic in 1986.

Anand saw himself as a Punjabi citizen of the world. Khushwant Singh once remarked on Anand’s English as ‘Punjabi English’. In his 1982 interview with Amarjit Chandan, he termed his sense of Punjabiyat as inheritance of Punjabi culture. In response to a question regarding why he opted to write in an acquired language and in which language he thinks, Anand said: “Punjabi is my mother tongue. I frequently use Punjabi vibrations. Vibrations of the characters of my landscape, my region could only express themselves in the versatile movements of the Punjabi speech. I could not perform an operation on my mother’s mouth to make her speak like an English woman, as do other writers. I think in Punjabi mostly and transliterate or transcreate in English. At that time [pre-partition] there were no publishers and the books written about India, certainly by me, were banned and there was no way by which even one could express oneself in Punjabi to the people who were around us in the Indian national movement. Even Puran Singh started writing in English first. He was the writer of the Punjab in English language before me if you like.”…

Any writer is free to write in any foreign language for global reach, acceptability and other related gains. However, it’s also true that in that global space they generally remain ‘categorised’ and ‘compartmentalised’ while their original place always remains vacant in the literary countryside of their mother tongues. It will also be pertinent to mention that no linguistic movement should encourage racists, bigots and chauvinists as there is nothing more sacred than humanity. We strongly believe that within one mother tongue are all mother tongues and each one of them is universal. Our main concern is not those other languages but the contagious ‘self-hate’ virus inherited by most of the ‘well educated’ Punjabis and its bankrupt elite that has consistently demeaned the linguistic uprising and their own cultural identity.

Read full article: http://tns.thenews.com.pk/in-the-name-of-punjabiyyat/#.VOBaHXYtKHl

The feminine metaphor by Mahmood Awan

Posted in Articles, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 4, 2015

Mahmood Awan January 25, 2015

Recounting the women poets of the undivided Punjab, a poetic history that lies buried under male monopoly

Punjabi poetics is unique in adopting the feminine metaphor. From our classics to contemporary poets, the most intimate and challenging verses resonate in this naturalised voice. Female protagonists of our Qissa (epics) poets from Damodar Das to Ghulam Haider Mastana are not only self-assuring and assertive but are full of defiance against male authority and a martialised society.

Najm Hosain Syed summed up this power of choice and rejection assumed by women in a striking one liner: “She stands outsides the cycles of time and society”.

Punjab owes all the beauties and colours of its folklore exclusively to its womenfolk. This was the art that kept us enriched and sustained us through centuries of compressions, invasions and annexations. Those nameless women poets of the Punjab narrated our collective consciousness and protected our native identity.

Read full article: http://tns.thenews.com.pk/poetry-the-feminine-metaphor/#.VNJTM3YtKHk

Submissions for 2015 Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature open

Posted in News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 4, 2015

Vancouver, BC (January 7, 2015) – Following the success of the inaugural Dhahan Prize, submissions are now open for the world’s signature prize in Punjabi literature on January 1, 2015. Eligible authors writing in either of the two Punjabi scripts, Gurmukhi and Shahmukhi, are invited to submit a work of fiction for the $25,000 CDN first prize.

Novels and short story collections published in 2014 will be accepted from January 1 to March 15, 2015 at http://www.dhahanprize.com. Two second place prizes of $5,000 CDN will also be awarded.

Based in Vancouver, Canada, The Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature was established in 2013 to recognize excellence in Punjabi literature and inspire the creation of Punjabi literature across borders. The prize is awarded at the international level each year to three books of fiction in Punjabi written in either of two scripts, Gurmukhi or Shahmukhi.

“This is a truly an international literature prize,” says Raghbir Singh, Chair of the Dhahan Prize advisory committee. “In our inaugural year, the Dhahan Prize received over 70 entries from 5 countries around the world. We’re hoping to increase our reach and the number of submissions for 2015, while continuing to encourage new writers to take up writing in Punjabi.”

The first prize winner for 2014 was Avtar Singh Billing for his book, Khali Khoohaan di Katha (The Story of Empty Wells), which will be translated from Gurmukhi to English this year. Two second place prizes of $5,000 CDN were also awarded to Zubair Ahmad from Pakistan, and Jasbir Singh Bhullar from India. Winners were feted at the Dhahan Prize Awards Gala in Vancouver on October 25, 2014.

Submission guidelines and eligibility terms can be found at http://www.dhahanprize.com/apply/.

About Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature:

The Dhahan Prize celebrates the rich culture and transnational heritage of Punjabi language and literature by awarding a yearly prize for excellence in Punjabi fiction. The Prize mission is to inspire the creation of Punjabi literature across borders, bridging Punjabi communities around the world and promoting Punjabi literature on a global scale. The Dhahan Prize is awarded by Canada India Education Society (CIES) in partnership with the Department of Asian Studies in the Faculty of Arts at University of British Columbia (UBC). The prize is funded by an endowment from Barj and Rita Dhahan, and family and friends. Learn more at http://www.dhahanprize.com and join us on Facebook and Twitter.

For interviews and other media inquiries, contact Manjot Bains at media@dhahanprize.com.

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