Punjab Research Group

PRG meeting 25 October, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 14, 2014

This is a reminder that the next PRG meeting is coming up soon on 25 October. The meeting focuses on the events of 1984 and beyond and will take place at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. Pritam Singh, Iftikhar Malik and Kaveri Qureshi are kindly convening the meeting. Please see the attachment for the full programme and directions to the University. Speakers include:

  • Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, India and the Sikhs since 1984: mapping the fault lines
  • Radhika Chopra, University of Delhi, A coincidence of commemoration
  • Nardina Kaur, Radical Philosophy, Deleuze and communalism: heuristic, therapeutic and preventive practice
  • Nuzhat Abbas & Alison Street, Parents Early Education Partnership, Working with Punjabi speaking families to support mother tongue through songs, rhymes and stories: challenges and opportunities
  • Amar Sohal, University of Oxford, Seeking a voice: the demand for Azad Punjab
  • Prabhsharandeep Singh, University of Oxford, Violence and Poetic Resistance: (Re)locating the Origin of 1984 Attacks
  • Iqtidar Karamat Cheema, Institute for Leadership and Community Development Evolution of Sikh nationalism and state-led repression in Indian Punjab

To make the appropriate arrangements for lunch and refreshments for the day could you please confirm your attendance as soon as possible. As usual there is a nominal charge of £15 (waged) and £10 (student/unwaged). If you would like to attend, please email kaveri.qureshi@anthro.ox.ac.uk.  

See full programme for details: PRG 25 October 2014

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Justice Denied/Collusion Denied 30 years later: Reflecting on 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on September 24, 2014

Symposium_poster copyJustice Denied/Collusion Denied

30 years later: Reflecting on 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms

Symposium and Academic Response

WHEN: Saturday, November 1st from 9AM-3PM

WHERE: Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies, University of the Fraser Valley, in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada Room F125

This academic response will feature a keynote address from Parvinder Kaur Mehta of Wayne State University as well as a panel of UFV scholars and a graduate student panel.

From Lost Childhood to Uncertain Future: 1984 Anti-Sikh Riots Victims

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on September 24, 2014

Exhibition_poster copyFrom Lost Childhood to Uncertain Future—The Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley presents an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of the anti-Sikh pogroms in Delhi. This exhibition features the photography of Mr. Sanjay Austa. The launch will include UFV speakers as well as a poetry reading from UFV students.

WHEN: Launch Date is Monday, October 27th at 4PM and the exhibition is available for viewing until November 13th

WHERE: Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies, Room F125

The 1984 Anti-Sikh Pogroms Remembered – Exhibition Launch Event

Posted in Events by Pippa on September 19, 2014

Wed 29 Oct 2014

Time: 7pm – 10pm

The genocidal pogroms against the Sikh people in India in November 1984 left thousands dead. In many of the outer areas of the capital, New Delhi, whole neighbourhoods were wiped out. Women were raped in large numbers. Senior politicians of the Congress (I) party led mobs, assisted by the police and administration. Thirty years on no memorials exist to the dead and the perpetrators continue to enjoy complete impunity. But the silence is slowly breaking. Not just about the damage caused to the justice system, memory and language in India, but also about the individual and collective trauma that exists within Sikh communities across the world.

Marking the 30th anniversary of the November 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms, the Wiener Library is proud to feature the work 1984: Jis tann lãgé soee jãné by photographer Gauri Gill. The images and texts from the artist’s 1984 notebooks reflect upon the pogroms and their ongoing impact in India. The images are from the resettlement colonies of Trilokpuri, Tilak Vihar and Garhi – various sites across Delhi – as well as protest rallies in the city. The accompanying texts by leading artists, poets, filmmakers and writers from Delhi remark upon the event, via the images, in thoughtful ways.

The exhibition also contains photographs of the pogrom as it occurred in November 1984 itself, and are drawn from the work of Indian photographers, Ashok Vahie, Ram Rahman and Sondeep Shankar.

Contributors to this project include contemporary Indian artist Arpana Caur; Senior Advocate and Human Rights activist, Harvinder Singh Phoolka, academic Dr Navsharan Singh; eminent historian Dr Uma Chakravarti; prizewinning Canadian author Jaspreet Singh and Parvinder Singh of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ).

The event, held in partnership with the National Union of Journalists, will take the form of a panel discussion chaired by Wiener Library trustee Philip Spencer featuring Lord Indarjit Singh CBE, human rights barrister Schona Jolly and Parvinder Singh of the NUJ.

Professor Spencer is Director of the Helen Bamber Centre for the Study of Rights, Conflict and Mass Violence at Kingston University. His most recent book, Genocide since 1945 (Routledge, 2012) traces the history of genocide since the Holocaust looking at a number of cases across continents and decades.

Lord Indarjit Singh CBE is Director of the Network of Sikh Organisations UK, Vice Chair and Founder of the InterFaith Network UK. He is also Head and Co-Ordinator of the Sikh Chaplaincy Services. He is a member of the House of Lords, editor of the Sikh Messenger, presenter of ‘Thought for the Day’ on BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 2’s ‘Pause for Thought’.

Schona Jolly is a writer, journalist and a barrister specialising in human rights and equality law. She is from London, but has lived and worked in a number of countries, including India. She is particularly interested in South Asian affairs and writes for a number of international publications on India. She is an executive committee member of the Bar Human Rights Committee.

Attendance at this event is free but booking is essential as space is limited. Please see The Wiener Library website for further details: http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=154

cfp: PRG meeting at Wolfson College, Oxford, 25 October 2014

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on September 10, 2014
Momentous events: 1984 and beyond

Punjab Research Group, Saturday 25th October 2014
A one-day workshop at Wolfson College, Oxford

It so happens that several historic anniversaries fall this year, which makes our October session of Punjab Research Group even more pertinent. It is thirty years since Operation Blue Star and the anti-Sikh pogroms. In addition, the outbreak of the First World War and the protracted tragedy of Komagata Maru off the coast of British Columbia, with scores of South Asians stranded aboard, remind us of the momentuous events in Punjab’s history and their on-going impact on the region in particular, and South Asia in general. The PRG’s forthcoming meeting is an opportune platform to discuss the context and aftermath of these events. We would particularly encourage papers discussing less-heard perspectives from women, religious minorities, non-dominant castes and classes, and welcome emerging scholars, independent writers and activists as well as academics. This one-day workshop is being hosted by Wolfson College, Oxford, a college with a strong South Asia research cluster. Please send 200 word abstracts and expressions of interest to Pritam Singh psingh@brookes.ac.uk, Iftikhar Malik i.malik@bathspa.ac.uk and Kaveri Qureshi kaveri.qureshi@anthro.ox.ac.uk by October 4th 2014. 

They lost their childhood to the 1984 Anti-Sikh Riots

Posted in Articles, Photography, sikhs by Pippa on May 1, 2013
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1984 and the violence of memory

Posted in Articles, sikhs by santhyb on November 1, 2011

Opinion piece by Ravinder Kaur in The Hindu

More than a quarter century on, not much remains of ‘1984′ — shorthand for one of the largest pogroms in India’s postcolonial history when thousands of Sikhs were massacred in retribution for Prime Minister Indira Gandhi’s assassination — in the public memory. The voices of victims and eyewitnesses one often heard in courtrooms have almost retired in exhaustion. The names of state-appointed serial commissions to establish the facts on ground have by now joined footnotes of history in a long line of ineffective judicial commissions of similar nature. And more remarkably, the miscarriage of justice through long-winded judicial processes where eyewitnesses routinely turn hostile due to threats, incentives, pressures exerted by fixers, or because of plain weariness has ceased evoking any mass outrage. In any case, the victims are supposed to have ‘got over’ the event and ‘moved on,’ precisely as enterprising and forward-looking communities are expected to do.

Read full article: 1984 and the violence of memory

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Sikh Art and Film Festival – November 13-15, 2009

Posted in Art, Events, Film by Pippa on November 7, 2009

Sikh Lens is proud to offer its inaugural—and independent—Sikh Arts & Film Festival.  The Festival celebrates Sikh culture and heritage, and will offer a variety of avenues for contributors to share their talent.

Get ready for a sumptuous treat that will light up all senses with a diverse assortment of films, books, art, performance pieces, and music that is “Sikh-centric.”  To mark the 25th anniversary of the anti-Sikh riots of 1984, we will have a special dedication with rare photographs and independent documentaries on 1984 riots; and lectures and a panel discussion by esteemed speakers from around the world.  The festival premieres stirring documentaries, book signings by notable authors, creations from world-renowned artists, and a special event showcasing youth performing music, poetry, rap, and everything else their creative imagination can conjure.  We want to prove that “Sikhs’ Got Talent.”  You will also get a chance to take a piece of our culture home through a silent auction.

Further details: http://www.sikhlens.com/

Brush Strokes of History – Monday 7th September, BMAG

Posted in Events by Pippa on September 5, 2009
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1984 & I: A Survivors’ Colony in Chandigarh by NIRUPAMA DUTT

Posted in Articles by Pippa on April 28, 2009

This year, 2009, marks the 25th Anniversary of 1984, when horrendous crimes were committed against the Sikhs in the very land of their origin. To commemorate this sad milestone, we at sikhchic.com have asked our regular columnists, as well as our contributors and readers, to share with us the impact 1984 has had on their lives.

 

A large oil painting of a tall and handsome Sikh dominates Lakhbir Kaur’s modest sitting room in Kumbra village in Mohali, near Chandigarh, Punjab.

“I found a small black-and-white one of my father in a relative’s album and my husband got a friend of his to make this painting.”

Recalls Lakhbir: “It’s the day after Indira Gandhi’s assassination. We were sitting in our home in Delhi‘s Sultanpuri watching television when the mobs started the rampage. Our Muslim neighbours immediately gave us shelter and advised my father to cut his hair and beard. My father, Deedar Singh, after retiring from the army, was working as a security guard in a private company. Since he was also the Congress President of Sultanpuri, he believed he was safe. Both my brothers were out and he went to look for them. He asked us to stay with the neighbours and said he would return shortly. We never saw him again, not even his remains.”

Read further: http://www.sikhchic.com/article-detail.php?cat=21&id=789

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