Punjab Research Group

PRG meeting 25 October, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 14, 2014

This is a reminder that the next PRG meeting is coming up soon on 25 October. The meeting focuses on the events of 1984 and beyond and will take place at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. Pritam Singh, Iftikhar Malik and Kaveri Qureshi are kindly convening the meeting. Please see the attachment for the full programme and directions to the University. Speakers include:

  • Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, India and the Sikhs since 1984: mapping the fault lines
  • Radhika Chopra, University of Delhi, A coincidence of commemoration
  • Nardina Kaur, Radical Philosophy, Deleuze and communalism: heuristic, therapeutic and preventive practice
  • Nuzhat Abbas & Alison Street, Parents Early Education Partnership, Working with Punjabi speaking families to support mother tongue through songs, rhymes and stories: challenges and opportunities
  • Amar Sohal, University of Oxford, Seeking a voice: the demand for Azad Punjab
  • Prabhsharandeep Singh, University of Oxford, Violence and Poetic Resistance: (Re)locating the Origin of 1984 Attacks
  • Iqtidar Karamat Cheema, Institute for Leadership and Community Development Evolution of Sikh nationalism and state-led repression in Indian Punjab

To make the appropriate arrangements for lunch and refreshments for the day could you please confirm your attendance as soon as possible. As usual there is a nominal charge of £15 (waged) and £10 (student/unwaged). If you would like to attend, please email kaveri.qureshi@anthro.ox.ac.uk.  

See full programme for details: PRG 25 October 2014

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Class, nation and religion: changing nature of Akali Dal politics in Punjab, India by Pritam Singh

Posted in Articles by Pippa on February 18, 2014

Pritam Singh∗ Faculty of Business, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0SB, UK

Commonwealth & Comparative Politics, 2014 Vol. 52, No. 1, 55–77

Abstract:

The Akali Dal is the best organised political party in Punjab and has ruled over Punjab for a longer period than any other political party since the creation of the Punjabi-speaking state in 1966. It articulates aspirations of Punjabi regional nationalism along with trying to protect the interests of the Sikhs as a religious minority in India and abroad. As a part of shaping Punjab’s economic future, it deals with the pressures of Indian and global capitalism. This paper is an attempt to track the multi-faceted pressures of class, religion and nationalism in the way Akali Dal negotiates its politics in Indian federalism.

To read the full article: Class, nation and religion- Changing nature of Akali Dal politics

Shared Idioms, Sacred Symbols, and the Articulation of Identities in South Asia, Edited by Kelly Pemberton & Michael Nijhawan, Routledge 2008

Posted in New Publications, News/Information by Pippa on January 13, 2009

shared-idomsAbout the book
How do text, performance, and rhetoric simultaneously reflect and challenge notions of distinct community and religious identities? This volume examines evidence of shared idioms of sanctity within a larger framework of religious nationalism, literary productions, and communalism in
South Asia. Contributors to this volume are particularly interested in how alternative forms of belonging and religious imaginations in South Asia are articulated in the light of normative, authoritative, and exclusive claims upon the representation of identities. Building upon new and extensive historiographical and ethnographical data, the book challenges clear-cut categorizations of group identity and points to the complex historical and contemporary relationships between different groups, organizations, in part by investigating the discursive formations that are often subsumed under binary distinctions of dominant/subaltern, Hindu/Muslim or orthodox/heterodox. In this respect, the book offers a theoretical contribution beyond South Asia Studies by highlighting a need for a new interdisciplinary effort in rethinking notions of identity, ethnicity, and religion.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction: Towards an Integrative Hermeneutics in the Study of Identity Kelly Pemberton & Michael Nijhawan Part I: Landscapes of Translation: Linguistics, History, and Culture in Focus Chapter 1: A House Overturned: A Classical Urdu Lament in Braj Bhasha Amy Bard & Valerie Ritter Chapter 2: The Politics of Non-Duality: Unravelling the Hermeneutics of Modern Sikh Theology Arvind Mandair Chapter 3: Who are the Vellalas? 20th Century Constructions and Contestations of Tamil Identity in Maraimalai Adigal (1876-1950) Srilata Raman Chapter 4: Can a Muslim be an Indian and not a Traitor or Terrorist? Huma Dar Chapter 5: Variants of Cultural Nationalism in Pakistan: a Reading of Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Jamil Jalibi, and Fahmida Riaz Amina Yaqin Part II: Landscapes of Ritual Performance: Ritual, Agency, and Memory in Focus Chapter 6: Ambivalent Encounters: The Making of Dhadi as a Sikh Performative Practice Michael Nijhawan Chapter 7: Ritual, Reform, and Economies of Meaning at a South Asian Sufi Shrine Kelly Pemberton Chapter 8: Gendered Ritual and the Shaping of Shi`ah Identity Diane D’Souza Chapter 9: History, Memory, and Other Matters of Life and Death Christian Lee Novetzke

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