Punjab Research Group

Indian Memory Project

Posted in Art, Digital resources, Photography by Pippa on February 17, 2014

The Indian Memory Project is a wonderful resource which features the Visual & Oral history of the Indian Subcontinent via family archives. Please follow the links to read the full text and see the pictures. These are just a selection of material relating to Punjab.

An avid sportswoman who managed several teams during the Asian Games 1982 – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/95/

Parveen Kaur (Arora) was born in the small hill town of Mussoorie, India in 1952. The ‘Arora’ family originally belonged to Rawalpindi, (now Pakistan), and moved to Mussourie during the Indo-Pak partition.

She served as an ad-hoc at Lady Irwin College and also had a brief stint at Miranda House. She finally got a permanent job at S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi in 1981. A year later, she became the manager of several teams at the Asian Games in 1982 which she believed was a great honour at her age. She also got married in 1984, a turbulent year marked with Anti-Sikh riots. The story of  how they survived the riots is another long one indeed.

She passed away, on February 4, 2011 and is fondly remembered by all the faculty, friends and family as one of the most zealous, interesting women and sports personalities of her time. The college has now instituted two yearly awards for ‘Outstanding Sports Person’ in her name.

The cockerel-fighter from Punjab who became one of Africa’s greatest cameramen – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/109/

Looking back over the 80 years, I wonder how, as a simple village boy from Punjab who never even finished school, did I end up in Africa, dodging bullets to make a living from shooting hundreds of kilometres of film in some of the world’s most dangerous regions.

I come from the proud martial family of the Sikhs. I do not know the exact date of my birth, although my passport says 25 October 1931, Baburpur, Punjab. At the time, births were not registered, and parents habitually exaggerated the ages of their children in order to get them into school early and so have their own hands free during the day. Baburpur, formerly called Retla (the place of sand), was renamed after Mughal Emperor Babur who had reportedly camped near our village for a few weeks.

The only non-white students of the batch – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/118/

cfp: Immigration, Nation and Public History

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on January 21, 2014
Wednesday 18 June 2014 at King’s College London
Hosted by the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies.
Convenor: Dr Eureka Henrich
Symposium Aims and Themes
This symposium provides an opportunity to reflect upon the tension between different representations of migrants in the public arena – from so-called ‘medical tourists’ and ‘problem’ populations, to immigrant ancestors and national founders, to affluent global citizens and international students. It asks: what part do historical perspectives play in these representations? Can we talk about a ‘public history of immigration’ within Britain or elsewhere? If so, what might it look like? In other words, where do we encounter historical narratives of migration beyond the academy, how are they constructed and who do they seek to represent?
 
Given the current context of escalating far-right movements across Europe, and tighter restrictions upon migrant movements in other regions, this symposium is particularly interested in locating and analysing national narratives of migration, their narrators and their audiences. If Britain and France are ‘nations of immigrants’, to be placed alongside settler societies like the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, can immigrants be seen as founders and pioneers rather than interlopers and outsiders? Who might these narratives appeal to, and whom might they alienate?
 
Immigration, Nation and Public History takes place on 18 June 2014, at King’s College London Strand Campus. The event aims to bring together a wide range of interested parties across museums, archives, galleries, universities, journalism, education, politics and public services. It is hoped that the symposium will establish research networks and new partnerships between researchers, practitioners and organisations.
While other submissions are welcome, prospective papers (20 minutes duration) might address themes such as:
  • Migration history in school curricula
  • Museums and migration (including exhibitions, public programmes, collections, and community engagement)
  • Migrant memorials
  • Forced migration (eg. convict transportation, slavery, child migration) and its representations
  • Migration in the news media
  • Public attitudes towards migration, how they are represented (eg. opinion polls and their use)
  • Family history/genealogy, and the discovery of immigrant ancestors
  • Links between migration and tourism
  • Links between national histories and migration histories
  • Representations of indigenous peoples in ‘immigrant nations’
  • Asylum seekers and refugees: historical and contemporary representations
  • Representations of migration/migrants/migrant communities in film and television
  • Migrant communities and individual’s self-representations
  • Changing representations of migration given the so-called ‘failure of multiculturalism’ in Britain and Europe
Submission Guidelines
Proposals should include:
– Paper title
– 250-word abstract
– Biography of 50-100 words
– 2-page CV
 Deadline: 31 January 2013. Notification of acceptance: 21 February 2014
Submissions should be sent to:
eureka.henrich@kcl.ac.uk
For more information see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2013-2014/MCAS/Immigration.aspx
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