Punjab Research Group

International Conference on “1947 : RETHINKING” 13th – 14th March, 2015

Posted in Conferences, Partition by Pippa on February 15, 2015

1947: Rethinking

Organised by Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

For participation and further details please contact:-

Director of the Conference:

Prof. Amarjit Singh, Chairman, Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (Haryana) (M) – 098121-84925

Landline No (s) – 01744-238410, 238196, 238679, Extn. 2558 & 2559 (Office)

 

Organizing Secretaries:

Dr. Nandini Bashistha, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 09729074479

Mr. Dharamveer Saini, Assistant Professor, Department of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 097288-61900

 

Email:

chairperson.history@kuk.ac.in

amarjitsingh_45@yahoo.co.in

Please attached for full details:Concept Note-1, Information regarding International Conference-1

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Gender Justice/Injustice in South Asia: Feminism, Protest, and the Neo-Liberal State

Posted in Events by Pippa on February 4, 2015

SOAS South Asia Institute

The SOAS South Asia Institute will be holding two gender focused events on the 12th and 13th February 2015. Please find information below and on the web.

**Registration required. Limited seats available**
Symposium : Gender Justice/Injustice in South Asia: Feminism, Protest, and the Neo-Liberal State


Image Source: ​ Source: Naz Foundation India  http://nazindia.org/
Date: 13 February 2015, 9.30am – 17.30pm

Room:  V111, Vernon Square Campus. Directions below.

Vernon Square Campus Address
SOAS, University of London
London
WC1X 9EW

About

This symposium brings together leading scholars and activists addressing a number of areas, including women’s access to and safety in the public space; the politics of gender in the context of caste and communal violence; neo-liberal notions of ‘rights’; the Indian and Pakistan states’ attempts to intervene in, regulate and control sexuality; religious supremacism and cultural conservatism; and feminist mobilization and protests.
The intention of this symposium is to not once again collude in reproducing the spectacle of gender violence in South Asia, but rather to critically engage with movements, policies and processes and to further our understandings of the systemic nature of gender injustice, how it is being simultaneously deepened, transformed and extended by the interventions of the neoliberal state, and the multiple ways in which it is being resisted.

Free Registration

Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.

**All successful applicants will receive an email by 11th February 2015 confirming their place. ***
Conveners:       
Dr. Navtej Purewal, Deputy Director, SOAS South Asia Institute, University of London

Dr. Kalpana Wilson, Senior Research Fellow, Gender Institute, LSE


Sponsor:
This event has been organised by the SOAS South Asia Institute in collaboration with the LSE Gender Justice Institute.

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE : THE POLITICS OF HISTORY AND THE HISTORY OF POLITICS: HISTORY, POLICY, MEDIA

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on November 25, 2014
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New Paper on Social Democracy in India by Ronki Ram

Posted in Articles, Conferences, News/Information by gsjandu on November 17, 2014

Jagtar Singh Dhesi Annual Lecture 2014

As part of this annual lecture, a revised 2013 paper, CASTE, NEO-LIBERAL ECONOMIC REFORMS AND THE DECLINE OF SOCIAL DEMOCRACY IN INDIA has been sent in for circulation. The paper reports on the at times inchoate and at other times ancient relationship between wealth generation, distribution and the hierarchical societal dichotomy of India’s democracy. Ram reflects contemporaneously on the asymmetrical relationship between the copycat “buzzword” of “economic liberalisation” in the circles of academic social sciences and the more predictable failure of this corpus to ignite change in not just political sociology but also I would suggest local and national governance ideology. As Ram concludes, “It seems that market and caste have joined hands to pose a most serious challenge to the nascent institution of social democracy in India.” (pp. 25)

 

Below is an excerpt outlining the paper.

“This paper is divided into four parts. The first critically examines the institution of social democracy in India while distinguishing it from that of social democracy in Europe. In the second, complex but intricate relationships among caste, poverty and neo-liberal market economy are delineated at some length. This part is based on a premise that neo-liberal market economy in India does not only deepens poverty but also strengthen the asymmetrical structures of caste, which in turn entrench the already existing social exclusion in the society. Part third deals with the phenomenon of social democracy as articulated by Dr. B.R. Ambedkar and the ways it facilitated downtrodden to improve their living conditions. How the institution of free market economy scuttles the essence of nascent institution of social democracy in India and the new challenges it throws on the socially excluded sections of the society are also discussed at length. The fourth part draws on heavily on the implications of the neo-liberal economic reforms for the emancipatory project of social democracy in India and the birth of new contradictions that it gave rise to the disadvantage of Dalits.” (pp.4)

The full text can be found here, pol1-13 Ronki Ram.

 

First publication source, Punjab Journal of Politics, Amritsar Vol. XXXVII, Nos. 1-2, 2013

 

G.S Jandu

London

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Drugs in Punjab

Posted in News/Information by Pippa on August 19, 2014

There has recently been a number of reports about the drugs problem affecting Punjab, India and I wanted to share some useful articles and documentaries. It has become a huge problem, politically, economically and of course socially. If you have any comments or links to other useful articles or references please share them via the comments option.

Glut – The Untold Story of Punjab – 2011 documentary film examining the drug problem in Punjab.

http://vimeo.com/19815617

 

Recent debate on NDTV: Watch: Punjab’s Drug Problem – No Political Will?

http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/left-right-centre/watch-punjab-s-drug-problem-no-political-will/330397

 

Four out of 10 men addicted to drugs in Punjab by Shishir Gupta

http://www.hindustantimes.com/punjab/chandigarh/four-out-of-10-men-addicted-to-drugs-in-punjab/article1-1251901.aspx

 

Drug epidemic grips India’s Punjab state by Simon Denyer

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/drug-epidemic-grips-indias-punjab-state/2012/12/31/092719a2-48f6-11e2-b6f0-e851e741d196_story.html

 

‘Drug hurricane’ lashing India’s Punjab by Toral Varla

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2014/04/hurricane-lashing-india-punjab-201442982348612953.html

 

Punjab teeters on edge of crisis as 70% fall into drug addiction by Rahul Bedi

http://www.sikhnet.com/news/punjab-teeters-edge-crisis-70-fall-drug-addiction

 

What happened to the land of plenty – Punjab? By Ushinor Majumdar

http://www.sanskritimagazine.com/india/happened-land-plenty-punjab/

 

Drug abuse threatens Punjab’s population

http://www.dw.de/drug-abuse-threatens-punjabs-population/a-16683761

 

Punjab in grip of a drug epidemic

http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/punjab-in-grip-of-a-drug-epidemic-1.1082442

 

Sinking into deep despair of a drug epidemic by Ben Doherty

http://www.smh.com.au/world/sinking-into-deep-despair-of-a-drug-epidemic-20130310-2fu2o.html

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British Empire and WW1

Posted in Articles, Events, News/Information by Pippa on August 5, 2014

ceramic-poppies-fill-the-tower-of-london-moat-to-commemorate

The art installation, called ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’, features 888,246 ceramic poppies – one for every British and Commonwealth soldier who died during the conflict.

The poppies have been laid throughout the summer by creator Paul Cummins and a team of volunteers. Further pictures: http://www.demotix.com/news/5441679/ceramic-poppies-fill-tower-london-moat-commemorate-wwi#media-5441668

The Hindu published ‘A European war, fought by India by Shashank Joshi.

If World War I resonates in such a weak, confused, and even negative way with Europeans, it is little wonder that young Africans or Indians see even smaller stakes in this year’s centenary ceremonies. This is why it is crucial to understand the war’s global scope and the role played by the British Empire and Commonwealth.

Read full article: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/a-european-war-fought-by-india/article6281135.ece?homepage=true

The News on Sunday ‘From the war front’ by Mahmood Awan

An account of the Punjabi soldiers who became the cannon fodder of the colonising power in World War I, and the mournful songs and literature this episode in history generated in its wake.

Read full article: http://tns.thenews.com.pk/punjabi-soldiers-on-the-war-front/#.U-CbG0gpOHl

‘Empire, Faith & War: The Sikhs and World War One’

The exhibition will be held at the Brunei Gallery at the School of Oriental & African Studies’ (SOAS), Russell Square, from 9 July to 28 September, and is the launch event of a three year project to reveal the untold story of how one of the world’s smallest communities played a disproportionately large role in the ‘war to end all wars’.

What Indian soldiers in the First World War wrote home about by David Omissi

To commemorate the centenary of India’s service in the First World War, the British historian David Omissi collected the letters of Indian soldiers away from home in Indian Voices of the Great War, published this year by Penguin. These eloquent letters offer a poignant glimpse into the lives of these Indian soldiers, whom history forgot.

Read full article: http://www.caravanmagazine.in/vantage/what-indian-soldiers-first-world-war-wrote-home-about

Women and Partition by Pippa Virdee

Posted in Articles, New Publications, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013

A couple of new articles on women and partition:

Pippa Virdee, ‘Remembering partition: women, oral histories and the Partition of 1947.’ Oral History, Autumn 2013, Volume 41, No 3, pp. 49-62.

Abstract: This article explores key developments in the way Partition has been represented in the history of India and Pakistan. It more specifically examines how alternative silent voices have been become more visible in the past fifteen years in the historiography of Partition. This shift has been made possible with the use of oral testimonies to document accounts of ordinary people’s experiences of this event in the history of India and Pakistan. The article then goes on to reflect on the author’s experiences of working in South Asia and the use of oral history as a radical and empowering tool in understanding women’s history in Pakistan.

Follow link for details: http://www.oralhistory.org.uk/journal-search.php?parameter=issue&searchkey=86

 

Pippa Virdee, ‘The Heart Divided: Writing the Human Drama of Partition in India/Pakistan’

http://imowblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/clio-talks-back-heart-divided-writing.html

Travel grants for research in India – deadline 31 March 2013

Posted in Funding opportunities by gsjandu on February 21, 2013

The Indian National Trust for Arts and Cultural Heritage (INTACH UK Trust) offers financial support for students who as part of their study need to travel to India to undertake research. Awards are made twice yearly and the next application deadline is 31 March 2013. We support research in all areas of cultural heritage, archaeology, architecture, dance, music, literature and much more. We particularly welcome scholarship applications which focus on skills development and capacity building.

Applications for travel grants, or for grants to support conservation or research work, are invited twice a year on 31st March and 30th September. In some circumstances applications received between these dates will be considered. Only applicants who are UK citizens are eligible for INTACH UK Trust grants.

 Scholarships may cover air passage to India and in some cases subsistence allowance, internal travel, and payment of fees to approved institutions. 

All applications for scholarships will need to be endorsed by two appropriate, suitably qualified or experienced people who can act as referees for the applicants. Grants for conservation work will not normally cover the entire cost of projects and grants will therefore need to be supported by funds from other sources. As applications for support normally greatly exceed available funds, INTACH UK Trust supports those projects or proposals which it considers best fit its remit, demonstrate good practice and offer the prospect of delivering significant conservation benefits. 

For more information on these grants and for an application form please see INTACH UK Trust Travel Grants

Thank you, and kind regards

 Sheila Christie

Office Manager

ICOMOS-UK

70 Cowcross Street

London EC1M 6EJ

Monday to Thursday 9.30am to 1pm

020 7566 0031

www.icomos-uk.org

Anand Patwardhan’s Portraits of India

Posted in Events, Film by Pippa on February 12, 2013

jai bhim comradeThe work of India’s foremost film essayist
23 – 25 February 2013
Legendary film maker Anand Patwardhan brings a cinematic eye to pressing issues facing India and the world today. Fiercely independent and never afraid to take on the censors, he writes and edits passionate, probing, timely and timeless films.

To open three days of introduced screenings and discussion we will show the award-winning film, Jai Bhim Comrade. A special event to follow will feature Anand Patwardhan in conversation with poet, Linton Kwesi Johnson.

“Legendary director Anand Patwardhan’s epic doc about dalit people is a massive, musical, magnificent, masterpiece” – Mark Cousins on Jai Bhim Comrade

“…a tour de force, beautifully shot and often darkly funny…” – Duncan Campbell on War and Peace in The Guardian

Further details: http://www.bfimessages.org.uk/t/ViewEmail/y/4C53B01AE72E9A13/70E856DF948D6100419C69E1CEBE89F9

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Raziuddin Aquil, ed. Sufism and Society in Medieval India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2010

Posted in Book reviews by Pippa on November 14, 2011

Reviewed by Usha Sanyal (Queens University of Charlotte)

This is an interesting collection of essays on aspects of Sufism during the twelfth through eighteenth centuries by well-known scholars in the field, such as K. A. Nizami, J. M. S. Baljon, and Simon Digby, among others. All nine essays have been published previously. They are brought together here, along with an introductory essay by Raziuddin Aquil, the editor, as part of Oxford University Press’s Debates in Indian History and Society series. Thematically, many of the essays are concerned with the role of Sufis in the subcontinent in Islamization and conversion of Hindus to Islam, with the authors taking different stands on the issue. Subsidiary sets of issues relate to Sufis and their relation to the state and to possession of wealth and property, as well as relations between different Sufi orders and between Sufis and scholars of Islamic law (the ulama), language, and social class. One essay, by Richard M. Eaton, deals with the role of women’s songs in transmitting Sufi ideas to illiterate villagers in the seventeenth-century Deccan.

Aquil frames the primary concern of the book, namely, the roles that medieval Sufis played in the conversion of Hindus to Islam, in historiographic terms by focusing on the perspectives of the essay writers themselves. Broadly, Aquil sees three distinct scholarly positions: those whose “writings … emphasize the pluralistic character of Indian society and the commendable role of Sufis in providing a practical framework for communal harmony” (essays by Nizami, S. A. A. Rizvi, and Carl W. Ernst, in Aquil’s view, belong in this group); those who adopt “a more empirically sustainable approach even while remaining committed to the idea of secularism and such other virtues expected from historians in Indian academia” (in this group, he places the contributions by Eaton, Digby, and Muzaffar Alam); and those who take “a Muslim separatist position” (the only example in the volume is the piece by Aziz Ahmad) (p. x). On the one hand, Aquil expresses strong disagreement with Ahmad, writing that he “offers a somewhat cynical interpretation marred by his separatist outlook, which, in turn, was influenced by the post-Partition Muslim predicament in the Indian subcontinent” (p. xv). On the other hand, Aquil feels that Nizami, for example, is prone to making broad generalizations, characterizing the ulama as “conservative and reactionary theologians,… [leaving] the Sufis to rise to the occasion, releasing ‘syncretic forces which liquidated social, ideological, and linguistic barriers’ between Hindus and Muslims for building a ‘common cultural outlook.’” In contrast, Aquil clearly esteems the work of those he terms “empiricist,” describing the essay by Alam, for example, as a “balanced and empirically dense argument on the question of community relations” (p. xvi). Seen in this light, the essays not only offer different perspectives on the roles of Sufis in medieval India, but also illustrate different academic approaches, over the past fifty years, to that history.

Read full review: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=32240

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CFP: RaD Conference 2010

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on November 7, 2009

 Religion shaping development: inspirational, inhibiting, institutionalised?

Conference organised by the Religions and Development Research Programme, 21st-23rd July, 2010, University of Birmingham, UK: first announcement and call for papers.

The conference (21st-22nd July) will bring together findings from the RaD programme and related research. On 23rd July, a range of development actors will be invited to explore the policy and practice implications of the research. Papers on the conference themes are invited – see further: http://www.rad.bham.ac.uk/index.php?section=1

Please send abstracts (2-400 words) to Dr Tina Dugbazah j.e.dugbazah@bham.ac.uk by 30th November, 2009.

2010 India Research Fellowship

Posted in Research Fellowships by Pippa on July 3, 2009

The Centre for Studies in Religion and Society invites applications from Indian scholars for a visiting research fellowship appointment at the University of Victoria.

Topics: Applications are welcomed for projects that meet the Centre’s mandate of promoting the interdisciplinary study of religion in relation to any and all aspects of society and culture, both contemporary and historical. Topics may include but are not limited to examinations of religious themes within the areas of ethics, health, environment, technology, public policy, human conflict, art, literature, the media, law, philosophy or the natural sciences. The fellowship is particularly targeted at scholars working on religion in modern India, though other topics will also be considered. Applications from all disciplinary backgrounds are welcome.

Eligibility: Indian citizens who are completing their doctoral work, are engaged in post-doctoral research, or who have regular academic appointments in India.

Centre for Studies in Religion and Society, University of Victoria, Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 2Y2 CANADA

Deadline: September 9, 2009

This fellowship is made possible by a grant from the Office of the Vice-President Research at the University of Victoria. For more information about the CSRS and its fellowship programs visit http://www.csrs.uvic.ca, or phone 250-721-6325.

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