Punjab Research Group

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Posted in Events, News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on March 27, 2015

Sangat: Dialog Punjab

Poetry is engrained in every aspect of the lives, stories, music, politics, philosophy, faith and culture of Punjabis. A number of us are gathering together to explore Punjabi poetry through time (and through this, a history of Punjab), meeting once a month at SOAS.

Starting with Baba Farid (12th century) through to Najm Hosain Syed and Amarjit Chandan writing today, we will focus in each session, on one or two poets; reading their poetry, listening to it being sung, and discussing it along with the historical/political/ philosophical context. We hope to have leading Punjabi poet Amarjit Chandan joining us for most of the sessions, sharing his knowledge, along with other guest writers/scholars/singers.

We welcome those of all ages and levels, those with knowledge, passion and interest that can be shared and developed, but also those who are new to Punjabi poetry/literature, who may not read Gurmukhi/Shahmukhi or be proficient in Punjabi, but want to listen and explore – we especially encourage you to join us.

For further information please contact ssai@soas.ac.uk.

Forthcoming Events

Session 2: Baba Nanak

7 April 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 3: Ravidas and Kabir

5 May 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 4: Guru Gobind Singh

9 June 2015, Brunei Gallery, B104, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 5: Sultan Bahu and Bulleh Shah

7 July 2015, Brunei Gallery, B102, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Session 6: Waris Shah & Damoodar (Heer)

4 August 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, 4429, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

The feminine metaphor by Mahmood Awan

Posted in Articles, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on February 4, 2015

Mahmood Awan January 25, 2015

Recounting the women poets of the undivided Punjab, a poetic history that lies buried under male monopoly

Punjabi poetics is unique in adopting the feminine metaphor. From our classics to contemporary poets, the most intimate and challenging verses resonate in this naturalised voice. Female protagonists of our Qissa (epics) poets from Damodar Das to Ghulam Haider Mastana are not only self-assuring and assertive but are full of defiance against male authority and a martialised society.

Najm Hosain Syed summed up this power of choice and rejection assumed by women in a striking one liner: “She stands outsides the cycles of time and society”.

Punjab owes all the beauties and colours of its folklore exclusively to its womenfolk. This was the art that kept us enriched and sustained us through centuries of compressions, invasions and annexations. Those nameless women poets of the Punjab narrated our collective consciousness and protected our native identity.

Read full article: http://tns.thenews.com.pk/poetry-the-feminine-metaphor/#.VNJTM3YtKHk

cfp: Relocating the Cultural linkages in South Asia: A Historical Perspective, 17-19 October 2014, Punjabi University, Patiala

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on July 30, 2014

The Department of History, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab (India) will hold its 2nd South Asian History Conference on 17-19 October 2014 at the University campus. This three day conference aims to bring together historians, academicians, research scholars working on the countries of South Asia viz. India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Maldives, Bhutan, Sri Lanka,Afghanistan and Myanmar to cover the gap in South Asian historical studies.
South Asia includes some of the most ancient countries that have made a unique contribution to world culture. These countries have strong regional affinities in as much as they share a common cultural heritage which is not totally indigenous but a product of continuous synthesis between elements, both external and internal. Peoples of South Asia belong to different races, practise different religions, speak different languages and yet share a common civilizational heritage which Arnold Toynbee calls as ‘ Indic’, No country of South Asia can comprehend its own culture adequately without taking into congnisance the cultural traditions of the region as a whole.

The aim of the conference is to historically examine the multi-centricity of the South Asian culture and demonstrate the commonness, inner dynamics and nature and extent of interaction amongst the countries of South Asia during different phases of history. It is hoped that the deliberations of scholars at the conference will rediscover the cultural linkages to foster co-operation, harmony, peace and mutuality in contemporary South Asia.
Suggested Themes: Themes might include but need not be limited to the following:
● Language and Literature ● Art and Architecture ● Philosophy, Religious beliefs and Practices ● Socio-Cultural institutions ● Socio- Religious reform movements ● Caste, Race, Gender and cultural traditions ● Science, Technology and culture ● Climate, Ecology, Environment and culture ● Cultural Adaptation and synthesis ● Search for unity in diversity

This being the centenary year of World War I , one section will be devoted to the significance of this event in world history with special reference to South Asia.

Call for Papers
The soft copy of the abstract with a maximum of 500 words, double spaced (in Times New Roman font size 12) written in English should be sent for acceptance at sahcpta@gmail.com on or before 10 August 2014. After scrutiny of the abstracts the authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of papers on 25 August 2014. The deadline for final paper submission is 25 September 2014. The authors should limit their papers within 15-20 pages

Registration
All participations are required to register. The scholars are required to register before or on 1 October 2014. The registration fees (which includes accommodation and food for three days) for Indian scholars is rupees 1000/-, for scholars of other countries is 50 USD. The registration fees for Indian research students is rupees 750/-, for research students of other countries is 30 USD.

Mode of Payment
The details regarding mode of payment will be conveyed shortly.

Accommodation
The organisers will provide accommodation to the paper presenters only.

Publication
The proceedings of the conference will be duly published in the form of a book from a leading publisher.

Other Information
Further details about the programme and sessions of the conference will be duly intimated.

Contact Information Send in your queries at hist.conf2013@gmail.com or contact us at: +91-175-3046192 +91-175-3046193
1. Dr. Jaspal Kaur Dhanju Professor and Head Department of History Mob: +91-9915583843
2. Dr. Kulbir Singh Dhillon Professor and Formerly Head, Dean Students Welfare Department of History Mob: +91-9417385002

Travel grants for research in India – deadline 31 March 2013

Posted in Funding opportunities by gsjandu on February 21, 2013

The Indian National Trust for Arts and Cultural Heritage (INTACH UK Trust) offers financial support for students who as part of their study need to travel to India to undertake research. Awards are made twice yearly and the next application deadline is 31 March 2013. We support research in all areas of cultural heritage, archaeology, architecture, dance, music, literature and much more. We particularly welcome scholarship applications which focus on skills development and capacity building.

Applications for travel grants, or for grants to support conservation or research work, are invited twice a year on 31st March and 30th September. In some circumstances applications received between these dates will be considered. Only applicants who are UK citizens are eligible for INTACH UK Trust grants.

 Scholarships may cover air passage to India and in some cases subsistence allowance, internal travel, and payment of fees to approved institutions. 

All applications for scholarships will need to be endorsed by two appropriate, suitably qualified or experienced people who can act as referees for the applicants. Grants for conservation work will not normally cover the entire cost of projects and grants will therefore need to be supported by funds from other sources. As applications for support normally greatly exceed available funds, INTACH UK Trust supports those projects or proposals which it considers best fit its remit, demonstrate good practice and offer the prospect of delivering significant conservation benefits. 

For more information on these grants and for an application form please see INTACH UK Trust Travel Grants

Thank you, and kind regards

 Sheila Christie

Office Manager

ICOMOS-UK

70 Cowcross Street

London EC1M 6EJ

Monday to Thursday 9.30am to 1pm

020 7566 0031

www.icomos-uk.org

2012 Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film Conference at Hofstra University

Posted in Conferences, Research, sikhs by harjant on September 29, 2012

2012 Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film Conference at Hofstra University 

Fall 2012, October 19-21, 2012

Sponsored by the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies

Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film 
Hofstra University and the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies are excited to announce a conference on the literary and visual cultures within, or pertaining to, Sikh traditions both in Panjabi and Diasporic contexts. The conference is designed to be explorative and is therefore open to any and all submissions within these two fields. This conference aims to chart new territory by exploring the aesthetic and expressive traditions within Sikh(ism).

REGISTRATION – NOW OPEN (Click here) 

CONFERENCE PROGRAM (Click here) 

 

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CFP: Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on March 1, 2012

 

Sikh Studies Conference. Department of Religion, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, Fall 2012, October 19-21st

Sponsored by the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies

Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film

Hofstra University and the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies are excited to announce a conference on the literary and visual cultures within, or pertaining to, Sikh traditions both in Panjabi and Diasporic contexts. The conference is designed to be explorative and is therefore open to any and all submissions within these two fields. This conference aims to chart new territory by exploring the aesthetic and expressive traditions within Sikh(ism).

Literary Cultures

Proposals are welcomed within the area of literature broadly defined, including: romance (kissaa), ballad (of war/strife, vaar), lyric (revelation), hagiography and biography (Janamsaakhiis), didactic and devotional (revelation, commentarial), revival and reform (political, nationalist, moral/didactic tracts), fiction and short story, poetry and new poetry, prose, drama and play.

Visual Cultures

Proposals are welcomed within the area of film or visual culture broadly defined including: Cinema/Film (Bollywood, Hollywood, Lollywood and Independent productions, Internet websites, YouTube, Vimeo, Music video-Rap, Bhangra), TV (terrestrial and satellite stations), Comic (Amar Chitra Katha, Sikhtoons), Fine Arts (miniature paintings, court paintings, modern art, photography, contemporary art), Commerical Art (calendar art, lithographs), Fashion and Advertising (e.g. Sonny Caberwal ,Vikram Chatwal, Waris Ahluwalia), Museum Exhibitions (V&A, Rubin Museum, Smithsonian etc), Architecture (monumental, temple and residential).

Deadlines

Paper proposals             May 1st,  2012                                    300 words

Final Papers                        September 1st,  2012                         5-8,000 words

Please send proposals to: balbinder.bhogal@hofstra.edu

 

Ram Sarup Aņkhi 1932-2010

Posted in Articles by Pippa on February 28, 2010

Ram Sarup Aņkhi, who has died aged 78, was a prolific Punjabi writer with 15 novels and eight story books and five collections of poems to his credit.
Aņkhi was Brahmin by caste but Sikh in appearance. He kept the Hindu name as is the custom in the Malwa region of East Punjab. Only a tiny minority of Brahmins converted to Sikhism and changed their names – Bhai Bhagwan Singh of Ghadar Party, Gyani Hira Singh Dard, SS Amol and Vidhata Singh Tir being the four most famous names amongst them.
Read full obituary by Amarjit Chandan: ram sarup ankhi

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Journal of English Language, Literature and Culture Studies

Posted in Academic Journals by Pippa on February 28, 2010

The Journal of English Language, Literature and Culture Studies is an annual multi-disciplinary refereed international journal. Unpublished research papers on any issue pertaining to the study of English Literature, Literatures in English, ELT, Translation Studies and Media & Cultural Studies and Book Reviews are invited for its first issue scheduled to come out in October, 2010.
Deadline for Submission: June 30, 2010
CONTACT ADDRESSES
Dr Vivek Sachdeva, Department of English
B.P.S. Women’s University, Haryana
Send your contributions by e-mail to: viveksachdeva09@gmail.com
See attached for full details:call for papers journal of english

Transnational Punjab Literature and Culture: Challenges and Opportunities

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on February 28, 2010

CFP: Contemporary Amritsar: Society, Economy, Polity

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on October 18, 2009

Department of History, DAV College, Amritsar
Venue: Seminar Hall, DAV College, Amritsar
Date: 30 November 2009 to 01 December 2009
Time: 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM

Interested scholars who wish to present a paper should submit their work address, provisional paper title and one page abstract of around 500 words to the organising committee at contemporaryamritsar@gmail.com by 30th October 2009.

Further details:Seminar Schedule and Seminar- Concept Note

Starved of literary gatherings

Posted in Articles by Pippa on September 5, 2009

August 27, 2009  http://www.thenews.com.pk/

Lahore has always been a hub of cultural and literary activities and has produced a lot many men of letter. Most of these activities have traditionally been revolved around cafes and restaurants that served intellectuals, writers and artistes with endless cups of tea and coffee and provided them with an opportunity to discuss subjects and matters close to their hearts and minds.

The colonial Lahore was full of restaurants and cafes with most of them locating along The Mall. One such place was the India Coffee House established by two Sikh brothers. Immediately after the Partition, the name India was dropped from the title and it was renamed as Pak Tea House. The Pak Tea House was located opposite to the Coffee House and Cheney’s lunch home on The Mall near Anarkali Bazaar. These two places used to have intellectual gatherings. Cheney’s lunch home was popular with people from different walks of life. University teachers and students were also frequent visitors.

The Pak Tea House had had a different status altogether. It was a hub of literary gatherings. Non-residents of Lahore used to call it their information centre that served them round the clock. Giants like Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Sa’adat Hassan Manto, Muneer Niazi, Ahmad Faraz, Mira Ji and Kamal Rizvi frequented the .Pak Tea House which became unofficial headquarters of an eclectic bunch of writers, artistes, musicians and the Halqa e Arbab e Zauq.

The celebrated fiction writer, Intizar Hussain, who had been a regular visitor to the tea house since 1949 till its closure, believed it was a cultural institution known all over the sub-continent.

No other literary institution of the country, including the Academy of Letters had credibility equal to the Pak Tea House,” he said. He said people freely expressed their political views in the Pak Tea House even in the repressive days of the military regimes of Generals Ayub Khan and Zia ul Haq. Literary interaction as well as literary programmes was the core of Pak Tea House.

It was recognized as a National Level Centre as people from all fields and schools of thought visited it.

This centre had played an important role in the promotion of literary people in Pakistan but during Sarajuddin’s era the Pak Tea House had faced a couple of disputes as it was a part of the YMCA so the authorities demanded its evacuation and took this case to a court of law. All literary figures and people had protested and the court very fairly announced that poets and writers were the soul of a society and were spiritual guardians and the Pak Tea House was known as a centre of knowledge and depicted the culture of Lahore so this place could not be used for any other purpose. After Sarajuddin’s death, his son Zahid Hasan owned the place. Because of financial constraints and his heart surgery, he wanted to open a garments or tire shop. However, the YMCA authorities again demanded evacuation of the tea house and the court didn’t give any decision at that time and the matter was still pending.

The Pak Tea House, having served against all odds for well over 50 years to countless poets and writers of all shades and political stripes, finally yielded to the irreversible forces of commodity culture raging. After the tea house places like Aadbi Baithak in Alhamra and Chaupaal in Nasser Bagh failed to serve the purpose. Many senior writers and poets had died, some have gone abroad. Sarfaraz Syed, a senior journalist and writer who was once a member of the committee of the Pak Tea House said that cities were recognized and respected because of their culture and literature.

For him, thePak Tea House and places like it were a source of intimation, information, education, knowledge and wisdom. —SAKEENA IBAD

(The writer is an intern from the Lahore College for Women University)

Punjabi Khoj Garh

Posted in Academic associations, News/Information by Pippa on July 14, 2009

Punjabi Khojgarh is centre of research, publication and advocacy on the history, culture, literature, music, and art of the Punjab. It was established on the 10th March 2001 under the initiative of celebrated poet and historian Mr Iqbal Qasier . It is maintained by the Punjabi Khojgarh Trust and individuals who work voluntarily to maintain and upkeep the Centre. They have lauched a new blog:

http://punjabikhojgarh.blogspot.com/

Photos of Khojgarh and from a recent conference on Guru Nanak which drew guests and speakers from around the globe including India.

Library at Khojgarh Iqbal Qaiser

Conference on Guru Nanak at PKG Conference on Guru Nanak at PKG

Conference on Guru Nanak at PKG Conference on Guru Nanak at PKG

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