Punjab Research Group

Travel grants for research in India – deadline 31 March 2013

Posted in Funding opportunities by gsjandu on February 21, 2013

The Indian National Trust for Arts and Cultural Heritage (INTACH UK Trust) offers financial support for students who as part of their study need to travel to India to undertake research. Awards are made twice yearly and the next application deadline is 31 March 2013. We support research in all areas of cultural heritage, archaeology, architecture, dance, music, literature and much more. We particularly welcome scholarship applications which focus on skills development and capacity building.

Applications for travel grants, or for grants to support conservation or research work, are invited twice a year on 31st March and 30th September. In some circumstances applications received between these dates will be considered. Only applicants who are UK citizens are eligible for INTACH UK Trust grants.

 Scholarships may cover air passage to India and in some cases subsistence allowance, internal travel, and payment of fees to approved institutions. 

All applications for scholarships will need to be endorsed by two appropriate, suitably qualified or experienced people who can act as referees for the applicants. Grants for conservation work will not normally cover the entire cost of projects and grants will therefore need to be supported by funds from other sources. As applications for support normally greatly exceed available funds, INTACH UK Trust supports those projects or proposals which it considers best fit its remit, demonstrate good practice and offer the prospect of delivering significant conservation benefits. 

For more information on these grants and for an application form please see INTACH UK Trust Travel Grants

Thank you, and kind regards

 Sheila Christie

Office Manager

ICOMOS-UK

70 Cowcross Street

London EC1M 6EJ

Monday to Thursday 9.30am to 1pm

020 7566 0031

www.icomos-uk.org

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Diasporas: Exploring Critical Issues, 5th Global Conference, 29th June-1st July 2012

Posted in Conferences, News/Information by santhyb on November 15, 2011

Date: Friday 29th June 2012 – Sunday 1st July 2012

Venue: Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for Papers:  This inter- and multi-disciplinary project seeks to explore the contemporary experience of Diasporas – communities who conceive of themselves as a national, ethnic, linguistic or other form of cultural and political construction of collective membership living outside of their ‘home lands.’ Diaspora is a concept which is far from being definitional. Despite problems and limitations in terminology, this notion may be defined with issues attached to it for a more complete understanding. Such a term which may have its roots in Greek, is used customarily to apply to a historical phenomenon that has now passed to a period that usually supposes that Di­asporas are those who are settled forever in a country other from where they were born and thus this term has lost its dimension of irreversibility and of exile.

In order to increase our understanding of Diasporas and their impact on both the receiving countries and their respective homes left behind, key issues will be addressed related to Diaspora cultural expression and interests. In addition, the conference will address the questions: Do Diasporas continue to exist? Is the global economy, media and policies sending different messages about diaspora to future generations?

Papers, workshops, presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on any of the following themes:

1. Movies and Diasporas

The presence and impact of displaced / globalized populations of audiences, spectators and producers of new mainstream /Hollywood/ Bollywood cinema are crucial to the emergence of this post-diasporic cinema, as these narratives from texts to screen constitute a fundamental challenge for the negotiation of complex diasporic issues.

2. Motivational Factors for Research into Diaspora

Factors are numerous including most prominently, artistic and musical creations, intellectual outputs, and specific religious practices and which have made a significant international impact.

3. Myths and Symbols: how to meet, and get to know each other through the use of creative lenses
Diasporas group, re-group and their group myths and symbols change accordingly. Or Diasporas remain dominated, their myths and symbols mirror (or rebel) their domination. This manifestation could take in linguistic, artistic and other creative forms right down to graffiti to propaganda. The effects of Diaspora through a creative lens, as often this is where the true effects of migration and cultural adjustment expose themselves in a personal and celebratory way. These could include:

* Creative Expression as a result of shifting and integrating cultures. Cross cultural and cross disciplinary practices / cross cultural collaboration / representing the self and the nation / connecting history to the future / third space practice

* Shifting Art Practices and how traditional folk based art forms (art / music / literature / dance) can accommodate and represent modern diasporic communities in flux

* New Languages that represent broken boundaries such as graffiti / rap/ interactive & web based art forms / global design aesthetics/ symbolism / sound & vision / poetry and text / Esperanto

4. Public, Private and Virtual Spaces of Diaspora

The controversial meaning of private/public spaces remain fundamental arenas in the re/construction of gendered identities in an in-between space as a Diaspora context nurtures challenges to traditional socio-cultural behaviors. Virtual Diasporas – This questions a range of pre conceived notions about physicality, actuality and place (which in turn open up the discussions around ownership, representation and nation). Virtual diasporas are not limited to the arts of course but the shifts toward new technologies within art and design production are highlighting such issues through various forms of creativity and the critique that surrounds it.

We anticipate that these and related issues will be of interest to those working/researching in philosophy, education, ethics, cinematic/ literature, politics, sociology, history, architecture, photography, geography, globalization, international relations, refugee studies, migration studies, urban studies and cultural studies.

5. Novel ways to think about Diaspora due to globalization

In the new global world in which cultures act simultaneously how should we be thinking about Diaspora?

Some pertinent questions in this area that the conference is interested in addressing are: What are some of the ways to identity and define the subject in changing political boundaries where cultural interactions are amplified? What are the processes of social formation and reformation of? Diasporas that is unique to a global age? How do an intensified migration age that is coupled with broader and more flexible terrains of social structures can give Diaspora communities a window of opportunity to redefine their social position in both the country of origin and the host country? How does immigration in an age where the media and the internet are highly accessible, bring individuals to deal with multiple levels of traditions and cultures? What new cross-‘ethnoscapes’ and cross-‘ideoscapes’ are emerging in? In what new methods can we capture the web of forces that influences Diasporas at the same time?

Other aspects of Diaspora that we are interested in having discussions about are:

* Economics of diaspora
* Gendered diasporas
* Queer diasporas ‘flexible citizenship’
* Contested diasporic identities
* Invisible diasporas
* Emerging and changing patterns – is there an ‘American diaspora’ in
China? In Dubai? Etc.
* Stateless or homeless diasporas – diasporas of no return
* Guest workers as diasporans?
* Diasporas created by shifting state boundaries
* Internal (intranational diasporas) – for example, First Nations or
Indigenous/Native migration into urban areas
* Diasporans by adoption or ‘diasporans-in-law’ (partners of diasporans
adopted into diasporic communities, extended diasporas through family
relations, etc.)
* Overlapping diasporas, entanglement
* Competing claims or multiple claims on diasporans Inter-diasporan or
multi-diasporan realities

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 13th January 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 11th May 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs;abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.

E-mails should be entitled: DIAS5 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Dr S. Ram Vemuri
School of Law and Business
Faculty of Law, Business and Arts
Charles Darwin University
Darwin NT0909
Australia
Email: Ram.Vemuri@cdu.edu.au

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: dias5@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the ‘Diversity and Recognition’ series of research projects, which in turn belong to the At the Interface programmes of ID.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be published in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into 20-25 page chapters for publication in a themed dialogic ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details of the project, please visit:

http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition/diasporas/

For further details of the conference, please visit:

http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/diversity-recognition/diasporas/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we
are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or
subsistence.

Rababi Kirtan Performances by Bhai Ghulam Mohammed Chand- November 2011

Posted in Events, Music by santhyb on November 3, 2011
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PRG meeting October 2011 – Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 31, 2011

This meeting was kindly organised by Kaveri Qureshi and supported by Wolfson College, University of Oxford.

Adnan Rafiq, DPhil Candidate Politics, University of Oxford
‘Challenging Social Structures: A Practice-based Model for Understanding Maverick Behaviour’

Muhammad Shafique, Department of History, University College London
‘Cunningham’s Lahore 1832-1849: Cultural Homogenization of Religio-Political Heterogeneity under Sikhs’


Pritam Singh, Faculty of Business, Oxford Brookes University
‘Instrumentalist versus intrinsic worth conception of human rights: the context of India and Punjab’

Gurdeep Khabra, PhD Candidate, School of Music, University of Liverpool
‘Music and the Heritage of the Punjabi Diaspora: Narrations of Cultural Memory and Cultural Identity’


Rusi Jaspal, School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham
‘The construction of ethno-religious identity among a group of second generation British Sikhs: a socio-psychological approach’

PRG Meeting 26 June 2010 – Coventry University

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 31, 2011

The meeting is in collaboration with the ‘Gender, Caste and the Practices of Religious Identities’ Project funded by the AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society Programme.

Tahir Kamran and Abida Kauser


Abida Kauser, Bahaud-din Zakaria University, Multan
‘Multan Under Colonial Rule (1849-1901)’

Minoti Chakravarty-Kaul


Minoti Chakravarty-Kaul, Formerly Prof. Department of Economics, Lady Shri Ram College, University of Delhi.
‘Land Tenure, The Commons and the Rural Community in Greater Punjab 1803-1947 An Institutional Analysis’

Sukhpal Singh


Sukhpal Singh, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
‘Political Economy of Institutional Mechanisms in the Indian Punjab’s Agricultural Sector: Experience and Issues’

Talvinder Gill


Talvinder Gill, University of Warwick
‘The Indian Workers Association Coventry 1938-1990: Political and Social Action’

Pandit Yashpaul and Tej Purewal


Pundit Yashpaul Former (Retd.) Head, Music Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh
‘A Journey through the Sacred and Secular Music Traditions of Punjab’

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The Hermeneutics of Sikh Music (rāg) and Word (shabad)

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on May 8, 2010

May 21-23, 2010 Hofstra University Organized by the S.K.K.Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies

Is music a language? Is there meaning in music? Perhaps universal meaning – given the popular platitude that music is the only universal language. Or is the meaning in music mediated by culture to such an extent that one is hard put to speak of universals? If the latter then does that imply a cultural limit to the supposed universal nature of the Gurū Granth Sāhib arguably the musical text par excellence? If the Word needs to be translated across linguistic contexts then does Sikh music also require translation into culture-specific and musical idioms to be efficacious? How to interpret and translate musical meaning? Is it even possible?

The purpose of this conference is to bring these two crucial dimensions of Sikh thought and practice, philosophy and aesthetics, together to initiate an academic dialogue between the Word (language, meaning, interpretation) and its performance in Music and Song (rāg/melody, tāl/metric cycle, laya/tempo, bhāv/expression, instruments etc). The conference aims to grapple with a hermeneutics that can cater for both musical evocation (kīrtan) and philosophical contemplation (kathā) as one phenomenon.
Full details: http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/REL/SIKH/sikh_hermeneutics_may2010.html

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Conference: The Hermeneutics of Sikh Music (Raga) and Word (Shabad)

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on December 28, 2009

 21-23 May, 2010, Hofstra University

Is music a language? Is there meaning in music? Perhaps universal meaning – given the popular platitude that music is the only universal language. Or is the meaning in music mediated by culture to such an extent that one is hard put to speak of universals? If the latter then does that imply a cultural limit to the supposed universal nature of the Gurū Granth Sāhib arguably the musical text par excellence? If the Word needs to be translated across linguistic contexts then does Sikh music also require translation into culture-specific and musical idioms to be efficacious? How to interpret and translate musical meaning? Is it even possible?

The purpose of this conference is to bring these two crucial dimensions of Sikh thought and practice, philosophy and aesthetics, together to initiate an academic dialogue between the Word (language, meaning, interpretation) and its performance in Music and Song (rāg/melody, tāl/metric cycle, laya/tempo, bhāv/expression, instruments etc). The conference aims to grapple with a hermeneutics that can cater for both musical evocation (kīrtan) and philosophical contemplation (kathā) as one phenomenon.

Further information: http://www.hofstra.edu/Academics/Colleges/HCLAS/REL/SIKH/sikh_hermeneutics_may2010.html

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Rabbi Shergill is one of a kind, says Sufi singer and scholar Madan Gopal Singh

Posted in Articles, Music, News/Information by Pippa on November 17, 2008

For Punjabi music and more importantly contemporary Indian music, eminent Sufi scholar, singer, filmmaker and a university professor Madan Gopal Singh feels Rabbi Shergill is nothing less than a blessing.

“His music is a breakthrough at Pan-Indian and global levels something that not many people have been able to do in contemporary music scene in our country. The Naxalite movement in Punjab gave birth to superb protest music in the region but again it didn’t go out of the state. I was singing Sufi music, doing concerts with Sahmat taking it all over the country but it was all very localised. One could never become the Pan-Indian phenomenon,” feels Singh who has closely watched Rabbi’s growth as an artiste.

 

To read the full article in The Hindu:

http://www.hindu.com/mp/2008/11/08/stories/2008110852010800.htm

http://www.hindu.com/mp/2008/11/08/stories/2008110852020800.htm

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