Punjab Research Group

Indian Memory Project

Posted in Art, Digital resources, Photography by Pippa on February 17, 2014

The Indian Memory Project is a wonderful resource which features the Visual & Oral history of the Indian Subcontinent via family archives. Please follow the links to read the full text and see the pictures. These are just a selection of material relating to Punjab.

An avid sportswoman who managed several teams during the Asian Games 1982 – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/95/

Parveen Kaur (Arora) was born in the small hill town of Mussoorie, India in 1952. The ‘Arora’ family originally belonged to Rawalpindi, (now Pakistan), and moved to Mussourie during the Indo-Pak partition.

She served as an ad-hoc at Lady Irwin College and also had a brief stint at Miranda House. She finally got a permanent job at S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi in 1981. A year later, she became the manager of several teams at the Asian Games in 1982 which she believed was a great honour at her age. She also got married in 1984, a turbulent year marked with Anti-Sikh riots. The story of  how they survived the riots is another long one indeed.

She passed away, on February 4, 2011 and is fondly remembered by all the faculty, friends and family as one of the most zealous, interesting women and sports personalities of her time. The college has now instituted two yearly awards for ‘Outstanding Sports Person’ in her name.

The cockerel-fighter from Punjab who became one of Africa’s greatest cameramen – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/109/

Looking back over the 80 years, I wonder how, as a simple village boy from Punjab who never even finished school, did I end up in Africa, dodging bullets to make a living from shooting hundreds of kilometres of film in some of the world’s most dangerous regions.

I come from the proud martial family of the Sikhs. I do not know the exact date of my birth, although my passport says 25 October 1931, Baburpur, Punjab. At the time, births were not registered, and parents habitually exaggerated the ages of their children in order to get them into school early and so have their own hands free during the day. Baburpur, formerly called Retla (the place of sand), was renamed after Mughal Emperor Babur who had reportedly camped near our village for a few weeks.

The only non-white students of the batch – http://www.indianmemoryproject.com/118/

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Women and Partition by Pippa Virdee

Posted in Articles, New Publications, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013

A couple of new articles on women and partition:

Pippa Virdee, ‘Remembering partition: women, oral histories and the Partition of 1947.’ Oral History, Autumn 2013, Volume 41, No 3, pp. 49-62.

Abstract: This article explores key developments in the way Partition has been represented in the history of India and Pakistan. It more specifically examines how alternative silent voices have been become more visible in the past fifteen years in the historiography of Partition. This shift has been made possible with the use of oral testimonies to document accounts of ordinary people’s experiences of this event in the history of India and Pakistan. The article then goes on to reflect on the author’s experiences of working in South Asia and the use of oral history as a radical and empowering tool in understanding women’s history in Pakistan.

Follow link for details: http://www.oralhistory.org.uk/journal-search.php?parameter=issue&searchkey=86

 

Pippa Virdee, ‘The Heart Divided: Writing the Human Drama of Partition in India/Pakistan’

http://imowblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/clio-talks-back-heart-divided-writing.html

Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture – call for papers

Posted in Academic Journals by Pippa on August 27, 2009

Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture is a new peer-reviewed journal published by Intellect (http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=173/).
Crossings provides a space for debate on the important nexus of migration and culture from diverse global and local perspectives, with a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary methodologies. The journal is concerned with questions of displacement, mobility, diaspora, cultural memory, and the negotiation of cultural identity and cultural representation in global and local contexts of migration from the mid twentieth century to the present day.
Contributions are sought from academics working in Migration Studies, Cultural Studies, Sociology, Geography, Media Studies, Philosophy, Politics, Film Studies, Oral History and Ethnography, Modern Languages and Literatures, as well as from cultural practitioners such as filmmakers, photographers, musicians, curators, writers and scriptwriters who work on or around the topic of migration. In addition to refereed articles, Crossings also welcomes review articles of films, music, photography, exhibitions or books on migration-related topics, as well as interviews with cultural practitioners who focus on migration-related topics and oral histories of migrant cultural experiences.
All submissions should be sent electronically to the Principal Editor, Professor Parvati Nair (p.nair@qmul.ac.uk)

De Montfort University – PhD Studentships

Posted in PhD Studentship by Pippa on May 22, 2009

Faculty of Humanities

Up to seven fully funded sponsored PhD studentships are available to candidates.  Each of the studentships is available for three years full-time study.

Building on DMU’s excellent RAE outcomes, bursaries will be awarded to exceptional students who will work alongside experienced research teams in the following areas:

Feminism and adaptations; Media discourse; Scholarly editing; British cinema – international connections; Oral history and ethnic minority experiences of consumption; Movement and modernity; ElectroAcoustic resources and pedagogy

Further details on Oral history and ethnic minority experiences of consumption

This PhD project will investigate the emergence of a strong ethnic minority retailing environment in the city of Leicester in the post-war period, focusing, through the generation of new oral histories, on the use of ethnic minority shops by different immigrant groups. ‘Ethno-consumption’ is a growing field within migration and ethnicity studies and this project will bring aim to develop new insights into the study of immigrant communities which traditionally focus on themes such as integration, work, housing and religion. Shops, especially, are a vital but neglected part of ethnic minority history. While ethnic minority entrepreneurship has been receiving more academic attention, the historical consumer behaviour of ethnic minority populations, and this interaction with community and identity, still needs more research.

Key themes would include:

  • Different kinds of shops and the different functions they performed
  • How these shops linked to community life and ethnic identity
  • How interviewees remember and narrate their experiences of using these shops
  • Other kinds of ‘ethno-consumption’ experiences

Groups to be researched would focus on the South Asian population as the largest and most significant group in Leicester in terms of retailing, but could also include other groups, especially the post-war Polish population and the Caribbean community.

Enquiries should in the first instance go to the Research Degrees Office, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH
Telephone: 0116 2506309. Web: www.dmu.ac.uk
Closing Date: 5 June 2009

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