Punjab Research Group

PRG conference, Saturday, 29 October, Wolfson College, Oxford

Posted in News/Information, PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 26, 2016

Attached is the programme for the upcoming PRG conference on Saturday, 29 October, at Wolfson College, Oxford.

You are very welcome to forward this on to any friends who you think might also be interested in attending as a guest. If you would like to book a place for the day, please complete the guest registration form online as soon as possible at :

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/punjab-past-present-future-punjab-research-group-conference-2016-tickets-27455044778

Full Programme:programme-outline-prg-22-october-2016

Abstracts: prg-conference-abstracts_-22-october-2016

We would also encourage you to use the above link to spread the word about the conference on social media and elsewhere.

Looking forward to meeting you on the 29th!

Best wishes,
Radha
on behalf of the PRG

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International Conference on “1947 : RETHINKING” 13th – 14th March, 2015

Posted in Conferences, Partition by Pippa on February 15, 2015

1947: Rethinking

Organised by Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

For participation and further details please contact:-

Director of the Conference:

Prof. Amarjit Singh, Chairman, Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (Haryana) (M) – 098121-84925

Landline No (s) – 01744-238410, 238196, 238679, Extn. 2558 & 2559 (Office)

 

Organizing Secretaries:

Dr. Nandini Bashistha, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 09729074479

Mr. Dharamveer Saini, Assistant Professor, Department of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 097288-61900

 

Email:

chairperson.history@kuk.ac.in

amarjitsingh_45@yahoo.co.in

Please attached for full details:Concept Note-1, Information regarding International Conference-1

New Paper on Social Democracy in India by Ronki Ram

Posted in Articles, Conferences, News/Information by gsjandu on November 17, 2014

Jagtar Singh Dhesi Annual Lecture 2014

As part of this annual lecture, a revised 2013 paper, CASTE, NEO-LIBERAL ECONOMIC REFORMS AND THE DECLINE OF SOCIAL DEMOCRACY IN INDIA has been sent in for circulation. The paper reports on the at times inchoate and at other times ancient relationship between wealth generation, distribution and the hierarchical societal dichotomy of India’s democracy. Ram reflects contemporaneously on the asymmetrical relationship between the copycat “buzzword” of “economic liberalisation” in the circles of academic social sciences and the more predictable failure of this corpus to ignite change in not just political sociology but also I would suggest local and national governance ideology. As Ram concludes, “It seems that market and caste have joined hands to pose a most serious challenge to the nascent institution of social democracy in India.” (pp. 25)

 

Below is an excerpt outlining the paper.

“This paper is divided into four parts. The first critically examines the institution of social democracy in India while distinguishing it from that of social democracy in Europe. In the second, complex but intricate relationships among caste, poverty and neo-liberal market economy are delineated at some length. This part is based on a premise that neo-liberal market economy in India does not only deepens poverty but also strengthen the asymmetrical structures of caste, which in turn entrench the already existing social exclusion in the society. Part third deals with the phenomenon of social democracy as articulated by Dr. B.R. Ambedkar and the ways it facilitated downtrodden to improve their living conditions. How the institution of free market economy scuttles the essence of nascent institution of social democracy in India and the new challenges it throws on the socially excluded sections of the society are also discussed at length. The fourth part draws on heavily on the implications of the neo-liberal economic reforms for the emancipatory project of social democracy in India and the birth of new contradictions that it gave rise to the disadvantage of Dalits.” (pp.4)

The full text can be found here, pol1-13 Ronki Ram.

 

First publication source, Punjab Journal of Politics, Amritsar Vol. XXXVII, Nos. 1-2, 2013

 

G.S Jandu

London

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2nd International Conference of History, GCU, Lahore 17-18 November 2014

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on November 1, 2014

Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership at DMU

Posted in PhD Studentship by Pippa on September 19, 2014

A great opportunity for UK/EU students. Have a look at the website for further details but if you are interested in developing a PhD project related to Punjab, Partition, women’s history in Pakistan or more broadly in another area of South Asian history please contact Dr Pippa Virdee (pvirdee@dmu.ac.uk) to discuss this further.

Offering you cross-institutional supervision, training, mentoring and career support to ensure that you produce world-leading research and maximise your career potential.

The Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) is a collaboration between De Montfort University and the universities of Nottingham, Nottingham Trent, Leicester, Birmingham and Birmingham City. This newly launched programme will provide you with combined research expertise for the personal and professional development, creating the next generation of arts and humanities doctoral researchers.

Through the partnership we aim to deliver excellence in all aspects of research supervision and training. We will assist you in acquiring the best supervision for your field of research, you will have access to a wide range of facilities and support networks across our campuses.

Visit DMU: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/midlands3cities-dtp/m3c.aspx

Visit http://www.midlands3cities.ac.uk to find out about this unique programme.

Drugs in Punjab

Posted in News/Information by Pippa on August 19, 2014

There has recently been a number of reports about the drugs problem affecting Punjab, India and I wanted to share some useful articles and documentaries. It has become a huge problem, politically, economically and of course socially. If you have any comments or links to other useful articles or references please share them via the comments option.

Glut – The Untold Story of Punjab – 2011 documentary film examining the drug problem in Punjab.

http://vimeo.com/19815617

 

Recent debate on NDTV: Watch: Punjab’s Drug Problem – No Political Will?

http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/left-right-centre/watch-punjab-s-drug-problem-no-political-will/330397

 

Four out of 10 men addicted to drugs in Punjab by Shishir Gupta

http://www.hindustantimes.com/punjab/chandigarh/four-out-of-10-men-addicted-to-drugs-in-punjab/article1-1251901.aspx

 

Drug epidemic grips India’s Punjab state by Simon Denyer

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/drug-epidemic-grips-indias-punjab-state/2012/12/31/092719a2-48f6-11e2-b6f0-e851e741d196_story.html

 

‘Drug hurricane’ lashing India’s Punjab by Toral Varla

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2014/04/hurricane-lashing-india-punjab-201442982348612953.html

 

Punjab teeters on edge of crisis as 70% fall into drug addiction by Rahul Bedi

http://www.sikhnet.com/news/punjab-teeters-edge-crisis-70-fall-drug-addiction

 

What happened to the land of plenty – Punjab? By Ushinor Majumdar

http://www.sanskritimagazine.com/india/happened-land-plenty-punjab/

 

Drug abuse threatens Punjab’s population

http://www.dw.de/drug-abuse-threatens-punjabs-population/a-16683761

 

Punjab in grip of a drug epidemic

http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/punjab-in-grip-of-a-drug-epidemic-1.1082442

 

Sinking into deep despair of a drug epidemic by Ben Doherty

http://www.smh.com.au/world/sinking-into-deep-despair-of-a-drug-epidemic-20130310-2fu2o.html

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A Qissa for a Globalised by Kavita Bhanot

Posted in Articles, Film by Pippa on August 19, 2014

QissaA Qissa for a Globalised World August 17, 2014

[Following is a guest post by Kavita Bhanot. She is a London based writer. Her short stories and non-fiction have been published widely in anthologies, magazines and journals, two of her stories have been broadcast on BBC Radio 4, and she is the editor of the short story collection Too Asian, Not Asian Enough (Tindal Street Press, 2011.) ]

There has, of late, been a revival of Punjabi cinema directed towards and watched by Punjabi audiences. A recent addition to Punjabi language cinema, albeit less ‘commercial’ and more ‘artistic’ is the Punjabi language film Qissa: Tale of a Lonely Ghost which has been doing the rounds at international film festivals and was screened last week at the London Indian Film Festival.

The film is about the violent consequences of son obsession in a Sikh refugee family in post-partition East Punjab.Visually striking, Qissa stands out for its cinematography; the framing, the use of shadows and light, the unusual angles. It was often absorbing, most of all in the scenes between actresses Tillotama Shome and Rasika Dugal, playing the couple Kanwar Singh and Neeli who find themselves in a predicament after marriage when they both discover that Kawar is actually a woman. Their interactions quiver with layered tension and chemistry.

Ultimately, however, the film doesn’t quite come together, it seems to lack internal coherence. I found myself watching it with a sense of unease, it didn’t carry me through, and when, in the post film discussion, the director spoke about the qissa tradition, connecting his film to this ‘genre,’ my discomfort increased.

Encompassed in the title, in the main heading (Qissa) and the subheading (The Tale of the Lonely Ghost), are two very different conceptions of storytelling, the film seems to hover between both of these, but falls ultimately, in the framework of the latter.

The Qissa is a storytelling tradition that is woven into the lives, culture of Punjabis. Qissas have been retold, reinterpreted in each era, often through music – the Sufi versions of these stories that are most well-known. Rooted in time and place – it is through particularity, detail, a connection with everyday life that qissas speak to the people of the region. Waris Shah weaves into Heer, perhaps the most popular qissa, painstaking, almost sociological detail about the customs, practices, beliefs, social, economic and political structures of the time. Qissas often portray, through love stories, the defiance and rebellion of ordinary people, exploring the radical potential of love and sexuality, as lovers and their accomplices defy the conventions, religion, ‘morality’ of an oppressive society. Qissas, in this way, critique social, political institutions, challenging power at all levels. While the lovers in Sufi qissas simultaneously symbolise the relationship between devotee and pir or guru, it is through the details, the emotion and earthiness of lived life that they become metaphors, that they become universal. Sufis understood that this was the way to connect with people.

Read full article: http://www.chapatimystery.com/archives/potpurri/a_qissa_for_a_globalised_world.html

British Empire and WW1

Posted in Articles, Events, News/Information by Pippa on August 5, 2014

ceramic-poppies-fill-the-tower-of-london-moat-to-commemorate

The art installation, called ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’, features 888,246 ceramic poppies – one for every British and Commonwealth soldier who died during the conflict.

The poppies have been laid throughout the summer by creator Paul Cummins and a team of volunteers. Further pictures: http://www.demotix.com/news/5441679/ceramic-poppies-fill-tower-london-moat-commemorate-wwi#media-5441668

The Hindu published ‘A European war, fought by India by Shashank Joshi.

If World War I resonates in such a weak, confused, and even negative way with Europeans, it is little wonder that young Africans or Indians see even smaller stakes in this year’s centenary ceremonies. This is why it is crucial to understand the war’s global scope and the role played by the British Empire and Commonwealth.

Read full article: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/a-european-war-fought-by-india/article6281135.ece?homepage=true

The News on Sunday ‘From the war front’ by Mahmood Awan

An account of the Punjabi soldiers who became the cannon fodder of the colonising power in World War I, and the mournful songs and literature this episode in history generated in its wake.

Read full article: http://tns.thenews.com.pk/punjabi-soldiers-on-the-war-front/#.U-CbG0gpOHl

‘Empire, Faith & War: The Sikhs and World War One’

The exhibition will be held at the Brunei Gallery at the School of Oriental & African Studies’ (SOAS), Russell Square, from 9 July to 28 September, and is the launch event of a three year project to reveal the untold story of how one of the world’s smallest communities played a disproportionately large role in the ‘war to end all wars’.

What Indian soldiers in the First World War wrote home about by David Omissi

To commemorate the centenary of India’s service in the First World War, the British historian David Omissi collected the letters of Indian soldiers away from home in Indian Voices of the Great War, published this year by Penguin. These eloquent letters offer a poignant glimpse into the lives of these Indian soldiers, whom history forgot.

Read full article: http://www.caravanmagazine.in/vantage/what-indian-soldiers-first-world-war-wrote-home-about

Special Issue of South Asian Diaspora: Imagining Punjab and the Punjabi Diaspora

Posted in Academic Journals, Articles, Migration, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on July 30, 2014

South Asian Diaspora Volume 6, Issue 2, 2014

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsad20/6/2#.U9jNzKgpOHl

 

Introduction

Imagining Punjab and the Punjabi diaspora: after more than a century of Punjabi migration

Anjali Gera Roy

Articles:

  • ‘The heart, stomach and backbone of Pakistan’: Lahore in novels by Bapsi Sidhwa and Mohsin Hamid Claire Chambers
  • Culture shock on Southall Broadway: re-thinking ‘second-generation’ return through ‘geographies of Punjabiness’ Kaveri Qureshi
  • Punjabiyat and the music of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan Virinder S. Kalra
  • Tracing Sufi influence in the works of contemporary Siraiki Poet, Riffat Abbas Nukhbah Taj Langah
  • Exiled in its own land: Diasporification of Punjabi in Punjab Abbas Zaidi
  • (Dis)honourable paradigms: a critical reading of Provoked, Shame and Daughters of Shame Shweta Kushal & Evangeline Manickam

COMPETITION WIN “*The Punjab Trilogy” on DVD

Posted in Film, News/Information by Pippa on November 5, 2013
COMPETITION
WIN “*The Punjab Trilogy” on DVD
Kitte Mil Ve Mahi / Where The Twain Shall Meet
Rabba Hun Ke Kariye /Thus Departed Our Neighbours
Milange Babey Ratan De Mele Te / Let’s Meet At Baba Ratan’s Fair

We are giving away one complete set of The Punjab Trilogy, documentary films by Ajay Bhardwaj.

To enter the competition just answer this question:
Who passes the message that Ranjha has arrived disguised as a Jogi to the Khaira’s village to Heer?

Email your answer to info@frankbrazil.org
With your full Name & Address
Add “competition” in subject header box
Deadline for entries: Sunday 24th November 2013
at 12 midnight (GMT)

The winner will be chosen at random from a draw of correct answers and will be announced on our Facebook page in the 1st week of December and all decisions are final.
One entry per person & we welcome entries worldwide.

*to find out more about the films visit www.frankbrazil.org
Photo: COMPETITION WIN “*The Punjab Trilogy” on DVD Kitte Mil Ve Mahi / Where The Twain Shall Meet Rabba Hun Ke Kariye /Thus Departed Our Neighbours Milange Babey Ratan De Mele Te / Let’s Meet At Baba Ratan’s Fair We are giving away one complete set of The Punjab Trilogy, documentary films by Ajay Bhardwaj. To enter the competition just answer this question: Who passes the message that Ranjha has arrived disguised as a Jogi to the Khaira’s village to Heer? Email your answer to info@frankbrazil.org With your full Name & Address Add “competition” in subject header box Deadline for entries: Sunday 24th November 2013 at 12 midnight (GMT) The winner will be chosen at random from a draw of correct answers and will be announced on our Facebook page in the 1st week of December and all decisions are final. One entry per person & we welcome entries worldwide. Good luck! Tajender Sagoo, Director/curator at Frank Brazil. *to find out more about the films visit www.frankbrazil.org

Women and Partition by Pippa Virdee

Posted in Articles, New Publications, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013

A couple of new articles on women and partition:

Pippa Virdee, ‘Remembering partition: women, oral histories and the Partition of 1947.’ Oral History, Autumn 2013, Volume 41, No 3, pp. 49-62.

Abstract: This article explores key developments in the way Partition has been represented in the history of India and Pakistan. It more specifically examines how alternative silent voices have been become more visible in the past fifteen years in the historiography of Partition. This shift has been made possible with the use of oral testimonies to document accounts of ordinary people’s experiences of this event in the history of India and Pakistan. The article then goes on to reflect on the author’s experiences of working in South Asia and the use of oral history as a radical and empowering tool in understanding women’s history in Pakistan.

Follow link for details: http://www.oralhistory.org.uk/journal-search.php?parameter=issue&searchkey=86

 

Pippa Virdee, ‘The Heart Divided: Writing the Human Drama of Partition in India/Pakistan’

http://imowblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/clio-talks-back-heart-divided-writing.html

Recording Punjab’s darkest hours for posterity

Posted in Articles, News/Information, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013
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