Punjab Research Group

cfp: Immigration, Nation and Public History

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on January 21, 2014
Wednesday 18 June 2014 at King’s College London
Hosted by the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies.
Convenor: Dr Eureka Henrich
Symposium Aims and Themes
This symposium provides an opportunity to reflect upon the tension between different representations of migrants in the public arena – from so-called ‘medical tourists’ and ‘problem’ populations, to immigrant ancestors and national founders, to affluent global citizens and international students. It asks: what part do historical perspectives play in these representations? Can we talk about a ‘public history of immigration’ within Britain or elsewhere? If so, what might it look like? In other words, where do we encounter historical narratives of migration beyond the academy, how are they constructed and who do they seek to represent?
 
Given the current context of escalating far-right movements across Europe, and tighter restrictions upon migrant movements in other regions, this symposium is particularly interested in locating and analysing national narratives of migration, their narrators and their audiences. If Britain and France are ‘nations of immigrants’, to be placed alongside settler societies like the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, can immigrants be seen as founders and pioneers rather than interlopers and outsiders? Who might these narratives appeal to, and whom might they alienate?
 
Immigration, Nation and Public History takes place on 18 June 2014, at King’s College London Strand Campus. The event aims to bring together a wide range of interested parties across museums, archives, galleries, universities, journalism, education, politics and public services. It is hoped that the symposium will establish research networks and new partnerships between researchers, practitioners and organisations.
While other submissions are welcome, prospective papers (20 minutes duration) might address themes such as:
  • Migration history in school curricula
  • Museums and migration (including exhibitions, public programmes, collections, and community engagement)
  • Migrant memorials
  • Forced migration (eg. convict transportation, slavery, child migration) and its representations
  • Migration in the news media
  • Public attitudes towards migration, how they are represented (eg. opinion polls and their use)
  • Family history/genealogy, and the discovery of immigrant ancestors
  • Links between migration and tourism
  • Links between national histories and migration histories
  • Representations of indigenous peoples in ‘immigrant nations’
  • Asylum seekers and refugees: historical and contemporary representations
  • Representations of migration/migrants/migrant communities in film and television
  • Migrant communities and individual’s self-representations
  • Changing representations of migration given the so-called ‘failure of multiculturalism’ in Britain and Europe
Submission Guidelines
Proposals should include:
– Paper title
– 250-word abstract
– Biography of 50-100 words
– 2-page CV
 Deadline: 31 January 2013. Notification of acceptance: 21 February 2014
Submissions should be sent to:
eureka.henrich@kcl.ac.uk
For more information see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2013-2014/MCAS/Immigration.aspx
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Women and Partition by Pippa Virdee

Posted in Articles, New Publications, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013

A couple of new articles on women and partition:

Pippa Virdee, ‘Remembering partition: women, oral histories and the Partition of 1947.’ Oral History, Autumn 2013, Volume 41, No 3, pp. 49-62.

Abstract: This article explores key developments in the way Partition has been represented in the history of India and Pakistan. It more specifically examines how alternative silent voices have been become more visible in the past fifteen years in the historiography of Partition. This shift has been made possible with the use of oral testimonies to document accounts of ordinary people’s experiences of this event in the history of India and Pakistan. The article then goes on to reflect on the author’s experiences of working in South Asia and the use of oral history as a radical and empowering tool in understanding women’s history in Pakistan.

Follow link for details: http://www.oralhistory.org.uk/journal-search.php?parameter=issue&searchkey=86

 

Pippa Virdee, ‘The Heart Divided: Writing the Human Drama of Partition in India/Pakistan’

http://imowblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/clio-talks-back-heart-divided-writing.html

Recording Punjab’s darkest hours for posterity

Posted in Articles, News/Information, Partition by Pippa on October 9, 2013

Special Issue, Journal of Refugee Studies

Posted in Academic Journals, Partition by Pippa on October 1, 2012

Some of you may be interested in a couple of articles in the current edition of Journal of Refugee Studies.

Special Issue: The Refugee in the Postwar World, 1945–1960

Guest Editors: Anna Holian and G. Daniel Cohen

Volume 25 Issue 3 September 2012

 

Cabeiri Debergh Robinson, ‘Too Much Nationality: Kashmiri Refugees, the South Asian Refugee Regime, and a Refugee State, 1947–1974’

Abstract

This article examines the development of a regional refugee regime through an examination of the international context in which ‘Kashmiri refugees’ emerged as rights-bearing political subjects. I distinguish between the refugee regime that was developing in Europe at the end of the Second World War and the refugee regime that was developing to handle the integration of Partition refugees into the new nation-states of Pakistan and India during the Partition of British colonial India in 1947. I also describe how the ‘Kashmiri refugee’ emerged as a distinct political subject within the South Asian refugee regime through treaties between India and Pakistan and provincial legal provisions, designated administrative practices by the national governments, and the eventual creation of a ‘refugee electorate’ in Azad Jammu and Kashmir. The constitution of a modern regional refugee regime that recognized refugees as inherently political subjects enables a critical perspective on the globalizing claims of the ‘international refugee regime’.

 

Tahir Naqvi, ‘Migration, Sacrifice and the Crisis of Muslim Nationalism’

Abstract

Drawing on oral histories and British, Indian, and Pakistani archives of the post-Partition era, this article considers the historical subjectivity of refugees to Pakistan who came from the minority-Muslim provinces of India. In contrast to Muslim refugees who arrived under the cover of a bilateral transfer of population, Pakistan’s leadership discouraged residents of the minority-Muslim provinces from leaving India. I trace how migrants (muhajirs) from the minority-Muslim provinces imagine their migration in terms of the theologically informed concept of ‘sacrifice’. I contend that the sacrificial imaginary mediates the rupture that Pakistan’s sovereignty created between membership and inclusion within the Muslim nation.

http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/current

PRG meeting October 2010 – University of Cambridge

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 31, 2011

The meeting was kindly hosted by Dr Tahir Kamran, Iqbal Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

Ajit Singh, Emeritus Professor, University of Cambridge
Inaugural speech and some reflections on Punjab development

Kaveri Qureshi, University of Sussex
‘Hopes and Disappointment: Transnational Education in Punjab’

Iqbal Chawla, currently visiting University of Southampton ‘Lord Mountbatten’s Response to the Communal Riots in the Punjab: An Overview’
Ali Usman Qasmi, Royal Holloway, University of London ‘Sacred Violence vs State Violence: A Study of the Multiple Narratives of the Punjab Disturbances of 1953’

Shyamal Kataria, Royal Holloway, University of London
‘Sikh Refugee ‘Collective Memories’ as a Source of Ethno-national Conflict: The Case of Khalistan’

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