Punjab Research Group

2nd International Conference of History, GCU, Lahore 17-18 November 2014

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on November 1, 2014

2nd International Conference of History On “Colonial and Post-Colonial Punjab”

17th -18th November 2014

Department of History, GC University, Lahore

Venue: Bukhari Auditorium

Please find attached the full programme for the 2-day conference:Conference programme final

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cfp: Technology and Religion in Historical and Contemporary South Asia: Spaces, Practices and Authorities

Posted in Conferences, Events, News/Information by Pippa on August 19, 2014

 

We are hereby inviting you to a planned panel on “Technology and Religion in Historical and Contemporary South Asia: Spaces, Practices and Authorities” at the XXI World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions on August 23 to 29, 2015, in Erfurt, Germany. Please find attached the tentative abstract for the panel.

For more information about the conference, please follow this link: http://www.iahr2015.org/iahr/index.html. Please note that all panel and paper proposals will be evaluated by the Academic Program Committee of IAHR and unfortunately the chair persons of this panel cannot assist you with funding for travel expenses.

 

Provided that the panel is accepted for the IAHR conference, the papers presented will be considered for publication in a volume on Technology and Religion in South Asia edited by Kristina Myrvold and Knut A. Jacobsen. The deadline for submitting abstracts (max. 150 words) is September 1.

 

Further details: Panel proposal IAHR 2015

Dr. Kristina Myrvold and Prof. Knut A. Jacobsen

 

cfp: Relocating the Cultural linkages in South Asia: A Historical Perspective, 17-19 October 2014, Punjabi University, Patiala

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on July 30, 2014

The Department of History, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab (India) will hold its 2nd South Asian History Conference on 17-19 October 2014 at the University campus. This three day conference aims to bring together historians, academicians, research scholars working on the countries of South Asia viz. India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Maldives, Bhutan, Sri Lanka,Afghanistan and Myanmar to cover the gap in South Asian historical studies.
South Asia includes some of the most ancient countries that have made a unique contribution to world culture. These countries have strong regional affinities in as much as they share a common cultural heritage which is not totally indigenous but a product of continuous synthesis between elements, both external and internal. Peoples of South Asia belong to different races, practise different religions, speak different languages and yet share a common civilizational heritage which Arnold Toynbee calls as ‘ Indic’, No country of South Asia can comprehend its own culture adequately without taking into congnisance the cultural traditions of the region as a whole.

The aim of the conference is to historically examine the multi-centricity of the South Asian culture and demonstrate the commonness, inner dynamics and nature and extent of interaction amongst the countries of South Asia during different phases of history. It is hoped that the deliberations of scholars at the conference will rediscover the cultural linkages to foster co-operation, harmony, peace and mutuality in contemporary South Asia.
Suggested Themes: Themes might include but need not be limited to the following:
● Language and Literature ● Art and Architecture ● Philosophy, Religious beliefs and Practices ● Socio-Cultural institutions ● Socio- Religious reform movements ● Caste, Race, Gender and cultural traditions ● Science, Technology and culture ● Climate, Ecology, Environment and culture ● Cultural Adaptation and synthesis ● Search for unity in diversity

This being the centenary year of World War I , one section will be devoted to the significance of this event in world history with special reference to South Asia.

Call for Papers
The soft copy of the abstract with a maximum of 500 words, double spaced (in Times New Roman font size 12) written in English should be sent for acceptance at sahcpta@gmail.com on or before 10 August 2014. After scrutiny of the abstracts the authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of papers on 25 August 2014. The deadline for final paper submission is 25 September 2014. The authors should limit their papers within 15-20 pages

Registration
All participations are required to register. The scholars are required to register before or on 1 October 2014. The registration fees (which includes accommodation and food for three days) for Indian scholars is rupees 1000/-, for scholars of other countries is 50 USD. The registration fees for Indian research students is rupees 750/-, for research students of other countries is 30 USD.

Mode of Payment
The details regarding mode of payment will be conveyed shortly.

Accommodation
The organisers will provide accommodation to the paper presenters only.

Publication
The proceedings of the conference will be duly published in the form of a book from a leading publisher.

Other Information
Further details about the programme and sessions of the conference will be duly intimated.

Contact Information Send in your queries at hist.conf2013@gmail.com or contact us at: +91-175-3046192 +91-175-3046193
1. Dr. Jaspal Kaur Dhanju Professor and Head Department of History Mob: +91-9915583843
2. Dr. Kulbir Singh Dhillon Professor and Formerly Head, Dean Students Welfare Department of History Mob: +91-9417385002

Raziuddin Aquil and Kaushik Roy, eds, Warfare, Religion, and Society in Indian History (New Delhi: Manohar, 2012)

Posted in New Publications by Pippa on March 7, 2012

Raziuddin Aquil and Kaushik Roy, eds, Warfare, Religion, and Society in Indian History (New Delhi: Manohar, 2012); pp. 341. Price: Rs 995. ISBN 978-81-7304-958-3.

About the Book:

This volume includes essays on a wide range of themes, marked by various distinct approaches to the study of connections between religion and warfare in Indian history from earliest times to the present. Such a collection could possibly cause some consternations, even as the editors began with the basic premise that some of the critical questions be discussed as freely as possible, despite constraints of ideological barriers limiting the fields of inquiry.

Written by a mix of veterans as well as early career scholars, the essays will provoke some debate on what all could possibly be undertaken as legitimate historical exercise and whether it is impossible to write a professional and non-partisan history of such politically sensitive issues as the entanglement of religion and warfare in Indian history and society.

List of Contributors

1. Breaking the Thigh and the Warrior Code

Torkel Brekke

2. Dispatching Kafirs to Hell?: The Languages of Warfare, Politics and Religion in the Delhi Sultanate

Raziuddin Aquil

3. India’s Military Revolution: The View from the Early-Sixteenth-Century Deccan

Richard M. Eaton

4. Rethinking Early Mughal Warfare: Babur’s Pitched Battles, 1499-1529

Pratyay Nath

5. Territories, Wars, Nation: Chronicling Ahom-Mughal Confrontation

Arupjyoti Saikia

6. Responses to Religion and Politics: Riti-kal Poetry, c. 1550-1850

Sandhya Sharma

7. Indian Subaltern Autobiographies: Two Asian Officers in the Eighteenth-Century Bengal Army

Michael H. Fisher

8. Strategies under Stress: Army Management and Environment in Late Pre-Colonial Bahawalpur

Richard B. Barnett

9. Science and Secularization of Warfare: Transition in Siege Warfare in South Asia from Medieval to Modern Times

Kaushik Roy

10. ‘The Nation Within’: British India at War, 1939-1947

C.A. Bayly

Book Review: The Politics of Religion in South and Southeast Asia edited by Ishtiaq Ahmed

Posted in Book reviews by Pippa on March 1, 2012

Dr Ishtiaq Ahmed, a renowned scholar of Pakistani origin, is presently a professor emeritus of political science at the University of Stockholm in Sweden. However, this book The Politics of Religion in South and Southeast Asia was conceived after a symposium in March 2009, when he was a visiting research professor at the Institute of South Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore. The purpose of the seminar was to investigate the role of religion in the countries of South and South East Asia. Dr Ahmed, as editor, has given an overview of the politics of religion in this region, followed by articles on the two areas separately: on South Asia by Ali Riaz and South East Asia by Bilveer Singh. These are followed by research studies in the form of chapters on Pakistan (Ishtiaq Ahmed and Tahmina Rashid), India (Tridivesh Singh Maini, Ishtiaq Ahmed and Rajesh Rai), Bangladesh (Taj Hashmi), Malaysia (Maznah Mohamad), Indonesia (Noorhaidi Hasan), the Philippines (Raymond Jose G. Quilop) and Singapore (Eugene K. B. Tan).

Read the full review by Tariq Rahman in Newsline: http://www.newslinemagazine.com/2012/02/book-review-the-politics-of-religion-in-south-and-southeast-asia/

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Sikhs in Europe. Migration, Identities and Representations, Edited by Knut A. Jacobsen & Kristina Myrvold

Posted in New Publications, sikhs by Pippa on February 10, 2012

Sikhs in Europe. Migration, Identities and Representations, Edited by Knut A. Jacobsen, University of Bergen, Norway; Kristina Myrvold, Lund University, Sweden (Ashgate, 2011)

Sikhs in Europe are neglected in the study of religions and migrant groups: previous studies have focused on the history, culture and religious practices of Sikhs in North America and the UK, but few have focused on Sikhs in continental Europe. This book fills this gap, presenting new data and analyses of Sikhs in eleven European countries; examining the broader European presence of Sikhs in new and old host countries. Focusing on patterns of migration, transmission of traditions, identity construction and cultural representations from the perspective of local Sikh communities, this book explores important patterns of settlement, institution building and cultural transmission among European Sikhs.

Contents: Introduction: Sikhs in Europe, Knut A. Jacobsen and Kristina Myrvold; Part I Sikhs in Northern and Eastern Europe: Institutionalization of Sikhism in Norway: community growth and generational transfer, Knut A. Jacobsen; The Sikh community in Denmark: balancing between cooperation and conflict, Helene Ilkjaer; The Swedish Sikhs: community building, representation and generational change, Kristina Myrvold; Sikhs in Finland: migration histories and work in the restaurant sector, Laura Hirvi; The Sikhs in Poland: a short history of migration and settlement, Zbigniew Igielski. Part II Sikhs in Southern Europe: Mirror games: a fresco of Sikh settlements among Italian local societies, Barbara Bertolani, Federica Ferraris and Fabio Perocco; ‘Did you get papers?’: Sikh migrants in France, Christine Moliner; Caste, religion, and community assertion: a case study of the Ravidasias in Spain, Kathryn Lum; Sikh immigrants in Greece: on the road to integration, Niki Papageorgiou. Part III Sikhs in the United Kingdom and Ireland: Sikh diversity in the UK: contexts and evolution, Eleanor Nesbitt; Sikh-ing beliefs: British Sikh camps in the UK, Jasjit Singh; The Valmiki, Ravidasi and Namdhari communities in Britain: self-representations and transmission of traditions, Opinderjit Kaur Takhar; The Sikh diaspora in Ireland: a short history, Glenn Jordan and Satwinder Singh; Glossary; Index.

Link to publisher – Ashgate: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&pageSubject=549&calcTitle=1&sort=pubdate&forthcoming=1&title_id=10934&edition_id=14157

Punjabi Subaltern Summit – 2012

Posted in Chandigarh, Conferences, Events by Pippa on December 30, 2011

Sunday, January 15, 2012, 11:00 AM to 05:00 PM

ICSSR Seminar Hall, Panjab University, Chandigarh

Agenda

The Punjabi Subaltern Summit is a one-of-its-kind conclave where politicians, thinkers, change agents, writers, artists, academicians and media professionals will try to find a common ground on the pressing problems that plague our state. An attempt to break free from the parochial structures that have suppressed the social narrative on lesser-known issues like caste, religion, representation and federalism. By harnessing the spirit and dialect of new media, it strives to infuse the intellectual mainstream with a sense of purpose and direction, bringing back the long-lost ebullience into its ethos. This non-partisan forum is a bold attempt reclaim the mantle of Punjabiyat.

One of its immediate aims is to influence the pre-poll debate in Punjab. We plan to organize this event every year in a bigger and better format, expecting that it will become a fixture or an annual pilgrimage for the regional intelligentsia.

For detailed information on the agenda and issues to be discussed, please visit: http://www.subaltern.in.

ESF-LiU Conference on Historiography of Religion, 10-14 September 2012

Posted in Conferences, News/Information by santhyb on November 15, 2011

Programme:  The conference will focus on the question: How, under which conditions and with which consequences are religions historicized? The conference aims at furthering the study of religion as of historiography by analysing how religious groups (or their adversaries) employ historical narratives in the construction of their identities or how such groups are invented by later historiography (comparative  historiography). Thus the biases and elisions of current analytical and descriptive frames have to be analysed, too (history of  research). Combing disciplinary competences of Religious Studies and History of Religion, Confessional Theologies, History, History of Science, and Literary Studies, the participants will help to initiate a comparative historiography of religion by applying literary comparison and historical contextualization to those texts that have been used as central documents for histories of individual  religions and analyze their historiographic character, tools and strategies. Furthermore they will stimulate the history of historical  research on religion; that is, identifying key steps in the early modern and modern history of research. The comparative approach will address Circum-Mediterranean and European as well as Asian religious traditions from the first millennium BCE to present.
Date: 10-14 September 2012

Venue: Scandic Linköping Vast, Sweden

Format: – Lectures by invited high level speakers

– Poster sessions, round table and open discussion periods

– Forward look panel discussion about future developments10-14 September 2012

Chaired by: Jörg Rüpke, Max-Weber-Centre, University of Erfurt, DE

Co-Chaired by: Susanne Rau, Department of History, University of Erfurt, DE

Call for Applications: click HERE

To learn more about the conference, click HERE

Conference flyer  – Please circulate this announcement among your colleagues and contacts!


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Sikhs in Europe: Migration, Identity and Translocal Practices

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on May 31, 2010

June 16 – 18 at the Centre for Theology and Religious Studies, Lund University

The Centre for Theology and Religious Studies at Lund University is organizing a conference on the Sikhs in Europe. The aim is to gather leading scholars in the multi-disciplinary field of Sikh studies and discuss current research projects focusing on patterns of migration, identity formations, self-representations, transmission of traditions and translocal practices among Sikhs in different parts of Europe. While two conference days are dedicated to presentation and peer-review of papers by the members of the academic network Sikhs-in-Europe, the third conference day will be a workshop for Ph.D. students affiliated to European universities. The conference is open to students and researchers in all disciplines.
Final programme: Sikhs in Europe – Final Conference Program (1)

British Religion in Number

Posted in Digital resources by Pippa on May 8, 2010

British Religion in Numbers, http://www.brin.ac.uk, has been officially launched. Please feel free to invite people to visit the site and explore the source catalogue, tables, charts, maps and text we have uploaded to date.

The site is (and always will be) a work in progress and we are still uploading data and commentaries, so please visit recurrently to see what we have added.

We also wanted to publicise the ‘blog’ feature (http://www.brin.ac.uk/news) and to encourage people to comment on the posts already made. Since we added this feature in January, we have posted 73 articles on new surveys and resources, research notes, and comments on news stories.
See further: http://www.brin.ac.uk/about/

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Seminar on Religion and Social Identity in Punjab

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on February 17, 2010

International Seminar on Religion and Social Identity In Punjab

Organised by Department of Sociology, Panjab University, Chandigarh in collaboration with the University of Manchester, UK

FEBRUARY 18-19, 2010

Venue: ICSSR, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India

See attached programme: Punjab University Programme

Debate about the right to carry a kirpan

Posted in Articles by Pippa on February 9, 2010

Should religion be an excuse for carrying daggers?

Sikhs should be allowed to carry ceremonial knives in schools and other public places, says Britain’s first Asian judge. But can religion ever justify loopholes in the law, asks philosopher Rebecca Roache.

The idea of children being allowed to carry knives while at school sounds like a red rag to a bull. But that is what Sir Mota Singh QC, Britain’s first Asian judge, who is now retired, says should be allowed. Not any old knife – but the ceremonial dagger known as the Kirpan.

The Kirpan is one of five “articles of faith” which also include Kesh (unshorn hair) and Kara (steel bangle) that are worn by practising Sikhs.

Read full article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8506074.stm

Mightier than the kirpanI find it hard to justify knives being allowed in schools – be they Sikh ceremonial symbols or otherwise

Hardeep Singh Kohli The Guardian, Tuesday 9 February 2010

What do you know about Sikhism? The men wear turbans. It comes from the north-west of India. It has at its heart the five “Ks”, the kesh (long hair), kara (steel bangle worn on the right hand), kaacha (undergarment), kanga (comb) and kirpan (a ceremonial dagger); all baptised Sikhs are expected to wear the five “Ks” daily. Sikhs are ­regarded as the best dancers in the world. This is all unequivocally true, especially the last part.

But I’d like to concentrate on the fact that Sikhism is the only world religion that requires devotees to carry a dagger. The function of the kirpan arose from necessity. From the end of the 16th century, as the Moghuls swept through Persia into the peace-loving hinterland of the Hindus, converting them to Islam, Sikhs became defenders of freedom, guardians of religious independence, champions of tolerance; and we were willing to lay down our lives for the cause. In that context it is easy to understand why we needed daggers, which were carried with us at all times since the threat of violence was constant.

Read full article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief/2010/feb/09/dagger-dilemma-sikhism-kirpan-schools

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