Punjab Research Group

PRG Conference 27-28 June 2014, Coventry University – revised programme

Posted in Conferences, PRG Meetings by Pippa on June 11, 2014

As you know this year we are celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Punjab Research Group. To celebrate this milestone we have teamed up with Dr Churnjeet Mahn, University of Surrey, and are planning a two-day conference at Coventry University. The conference will be supported by the AHRC project, ‘A Punjabi Palimpsest: Cultural Memory and Amnesia at the Aam Khas Bagh’. A website connected to the project can be found here: http://www.thegtroad.com.

Attached are all the details for the conference, including the programme and abstracts. If you would like to attend please complete the registration form and send this to me by Thursday 19 June. Please note that the programme for Saturday has been revised and extended.

Abstracts

PRG 27-28 June 2014

Useful Information

blank registration form

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‘In one hand a pen in the other a gun’: Punjabi language radicalism in Punjab, Pakistan by Kalra & Butt

Posted in Articles, New Publications by Pippa on September 18, 2013

‘In one hand a pen in the other a gun’: Punjabi language radicalism in Punjab, Pakistan by Virinder S. Kalra & Waqas M. Butt

Published in South Asian History and Culture, 2013

Abstract

The relationship between language and politics in South Asia has provided a rich vein for academic analysis as it is tied up with issues related to nationalism and political mobilization. However, much of this analysis has been based on the Indian reorganization of states along linguistic lines or the role of language in the Bangladeshi liberation movement. This article discusses the role of language in the mobilization of the Left in Pakistan, specifically the way in which Punjabi was utilized by the Mazdoor Kisan Party at the theoretical and practical levels, in its mobilizing in the early 1970s. The role that language played in the site of student politics is illustrated through a case study of Sahiwal College. Overall, the role that Punjabi played as a mobilizing tool for the Left in Pakistan demonstrates a practice where culture and politics are inseparable and in this sense the article contributes to the wider debates on language and politics in South Asia.

Full article: Punjabi Language Radicalism

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