Punjab Research Group

Gender Justice/Injustice in South Asia: Feminism, Protest, and the Neo-Liberal State

Posted in Events by Pippa on February 4, 2015

SOAS South Asia Institute

The SOAS South Asia Institute will be holding two gender focused events on the 12th and 13th February 2015. Please find information below and on the web.

**Registration required. Limited seats available**
Symposium : Gender Justice/Injustice in South Asia: Feminism, Protest, and the Neo-Liberal State


Image Source: ​ Source: Naz Foundation India  http://nazindia.org/
Date: 13 February 2015, 9.30am – 17.30pm

Room:  V111, Vernon Square Campus. Directions below.

Vernon Square Campus Address
SOAS, University of London
London
WC1X 9EW

About

This symposium brings together leading scholars and activists addressing a number of areas, including women’s access to and safety in the public space; the politics of gender in the context of caste and communal violence; neo-liberal notions of ‘rights’; the Indian and Pakistan states’ attempts to intervene in, regulate and control sexuality; religious supremacism and cultural conservatism; and feminist mobilization and protests.
The intention of this symposium is to not once again collude in reproducing the spectacle of gender violence in South Asia, but rather to critically engage with movements, policies and processes and to further our understandings of the systemic nature of gender injustice, how it is being simultaneously deepened, transformed and extended by the interventions of the neoliberal state, and the multiple ways in which it is being resisted.

Free Registration

Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis.

**All successful applicants will receive an email by 11th February 2015 confirming their place. ***
Conveners:       
Dr. Navtej Purewal, Deputy Director, SOAS South Asia Institute, University of London

Dr. Kalpana Wilson, Senior Research Fellow, Gender Institute, LSE


Sponsor:
This event has been organised by the SOAS South Asia Institute in collaboration with the LSE Gender Justice Institute.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Violence, Memory, and the Dynamics of Transnational Youth Formations

Posted in Academic Journals by Pippa on October 9, 2012

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Violence, Memory, and the Dynamics of Transnational Youth Formations

Eds Kamal Arora, Duygu Gül & Michael Nijhawan

We invite submissions for a special issue of Sikh Formations that tackles the relationship between violence, memory and transnational youth formations. In recent years, we are witnessing a massive mobilization of youth not only in the streets of the Middle East, but globally, from Spain to Quebec, and London to Athens. Youth are engaged in forms of identity making in contexts of neoliberal capitalism, authoritarian states, and diasporic spaces. This special issue seeks to shed light on youth subjectivities and contemporary forms of social and political engagements through a transnational lens. We invite contributions that assess the burgeoning forms of transnational contours of youth formations, and reflect on new languages emerging in encounters with states, political regimes and other actors. As this issue is interdisciplinary and the focus is transnational, scholarly papers as well as creative works that focus on a wide variety of geographical localities, including a transnational and/or diasporic component are welcome.

Broadly, we welcome papers that:

  • theorize youth formations in relation to violence and memory, which might include social and political activism, social media, multiculturalism and the state, diaspora and transnationalism, gendered identities, security and migration, religion and secularism;
  • reflect on the specificity, flexibility and adaptability of the category of “youth” in each analyzed context by paying specific attention to the politics of categorization;
  • examine diasporic contexts and formation of other youth constellations, be they nationally or internationally defined.

We invite authors to submit papers that reflect multiple interdisciplinary perspectives, including scholarly papers as well as creative works such as non-fiction narrative, poetry, memoir and photographic essays. The deadline for abstracts is: December 10th, 2012. Detailed abstracts of 300-500 words should be e-mailed to youthfor@yorku.ca by December 10th, 2012. Once abstracts have been selected by the editorial team, authors are requested to submit their manuscripts by May 1st, 2013. Manuscripts for scholarly papers should follow the format provided on ‘Instructions for Authors’ page of the Sikh Formations website and be between 8000 to 10000 words, including all notes and references. Narrative pieces or creative essays should not exceed 2000 words. If you wish to have more information about this special issue, please contact us at youthfor@yorku.ca .

Guest editors Kamal Arora, Duygu Gül & Michael Nijhawan.

Horrors of Partition, by A.G. Noorani

Posted in Book reviews, New Publications, Partition by Pippa on March 1, 2012

Frontline Vol 29 – Issue 4

Book review of The Punjab Bloodied, Partitioned and Cleansed by Ishtiaq Ahmed; Partition Observed edited by Lionel Carter and Partition and Locality by Illyas Chattha.

In addition to the loss of human lives and property, the near-fatal blows on cultures mark Partition’s distinctively hideous features.

THE partition of the subcontinent of India deserves to rank as one of the 10 great tragedies in recorded human history. That is saying a lot. It is not only the loss of human lives and property but the near-fatal blows on cultures that mark its distinctively hideous features. Urdu and the composite Ganga-Jamuna tehzeeb (culture) suffered grievously. People were uprooted, leaving an impoverished culture behind them. Of all the provinces, Punjab suffered the most. The massacre that preceded and followed its partition, along with that of India, was predictable and was predicted.

“Pakistan would mean a massacre,” the Premier of Punjab Sir Sikandar Hyat Khan predicted to the distinguished civilian Penderel Moon as early as in October 1938 ( Divide and Quit, page 20). That was well before the Muslim League adopted the Pakistan resolution on March 23, 1940, in Lahore, radically altering Sir Sikandar’s draft just 24 hours before it was passed. He repudiated it because it dropped the organic link between the two parts of India, which he had provided. He told the Punjab Legislative Assembly, on March 11, 1941, “We do not ask for freedom that there may be Muslim Raj here and Hindu Raj elsewhere. If that is what Pakistan means I will have nothing to do with it.”

Read full review:

http://www.frontline.in/stories/20120309290407300.htm

PRG meeting October 2010 – University of Cambridge

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 31, 2011

The meeting was kindly hosted by Dr Tahir Kamran, Iqbal Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

Ajit Singh, Emeritus Professor, University of Cambridge
Inaugural speech and some reflections on Punjab development

Kaveri Qureshi, University of Sussex
‘Hopes and Disappointment: Transnational Education in Punjab’

Iqbal Chawla, currently visiting University of Southampton ‘Lord Mountbatten’s Response to the Communal Riots in the Punjab: An Overview’
Ali Usman Qasmi, Royal Holloway, University of London ‘Sacred Violence vs State Violence: A Study of the Multiple Narratives of the Punjab Disturbances of 1953’

Shyamal Kataria, Royal Holloway, University of London
‘Sikh Refugee ‘Collective Memories’ as a Source of Ethno-national Conflict: The Case of Khalistan’

Violence Against Women in South Asian Communities: Issues for Policy and Practice

Posted in New Publications by Pippa on October 18, 2009

Edited by Ravi K Thiara and Aisha K Gill, Foreword by Professor Liz Kelly CBE

‘This book is powerful, challenging and inspirational, and is an important contribution to debates on the complex intersections between ethnicity, gender and inequality, as well as on human rights and violence against women. Thiara and Gill and the contributors to this text skillfully unpick the flawed thinking and policy initiatives directed at gender-based violence over the past 30 years and especially in the post 9/11 period community cohesion and anti-terrorism initiatives.’
– Dr Lorraine Radford, Head of Research, NSPCC

‘This is a stimulating and provocative collection which explores the difficult concepts of ‘multiculturalism’, ‘ethnic identity’ and ‘secularisation’ in relation to gendered violence. The authors challenge myths and stereotypes about the ‘Asian’ experience in relation to interpersonal violence without oversimplifying or homogenising black and minority ethnic (BME) women’s experiences. Despite cataloguing the ongoing struggles against racism and misogyny, and the intersection of both, the editors conclude the text with optimism; an additional reason to recommend this text to all policy makers, practitioners, academics and students, as well as those interested in the provenance of BME anti-violence organisations and current UK policy.’
– Dr Melanie McCarry, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol

http://www.jkp.com/catalogue/book/9781843106708/review/

SAMAJ – South Asia Multidisciplinary Academic Journal

Posted in Academic Journals, Articles, News/Information by Pippa on January 25, 2009

SAMAJ is pleased to announce the publication of its latest yearly Special Issue on  ”’Outraged Communities’: Comparative Perspectives on the Politicization of Emotions in South Asia”, with articles by Nosheen Ali, Amélie Blom, Thomas Blom Hansen, Pierre Centlivres, Christophe Jaffrelot, Nicolas Jaoul, Ali Riaz, Charlène Simon and Lionel Baixas.

 

This issue is accessible in full at: http://samaj.revues.org/sommaire234.html

The next issue, edited by Balveer Arora, Stéphanie Tawa Lama-Rewal  and Gilles Verniers, will be devoted to “Indian Elections 2009: Perspectives from the States”.

 

SAMAJ also features free-subject articles, such as our latest one: ‘Questioning the Role of the Indian Administrative Service in National Integration’ (Dalel Benbabaali).

 

SAMAJ is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, on-line journal, devoted to social science studies on South Asia. For more information, please visit our website http://samaj.revues.org/

 

SAMAJ Editorial Board

(Nosheen Ali, Luc Bellon, Amélie Blom, Miniya Chatterji, Jérémie Codron, Gilles Dorronsoro, Nicolas Jaoul, Loraine Kennedy, Aminah Mohammad-Arif, Christine Moliner, Mariam Mufti, Stéphanie Tawa Lama-Rewal and Ingrid Therwath)

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