Punjab Research Group

PRG meeting 25 October, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 14, 2014

This is a reminder that the next PRG meeting is coming up soon on 25 October. The meeting focuses on the events of 1984 and beyond and will take place at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. Pritam Singh, Iftikhar Malik and Kaveri Qureshi are kindly convening the meeting. Please see the attachment for the full programme and directions to the University. Speakers include:

  • Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, India and the Sikhs since 1984: mapping the fault lines
  • Radhika Chopra, University of Delhi, A coincidence of commemoration
  • Nardina Kaur, Radical Philosophy, Deleuze and communalism: heuristic, therapeutic and preventive practice
  • Nuzhat Abbas & Alison Street, Parents Early Education Partnership, Working with Punjabi speaking families to support mother tongue through songs, rhymes and stories: challenges and opportunities
  • Amar Sohal, University of Oxford, Seeking a voice: the demand for Azad Punjab
  • Prabhsharandeep Singh, University of Oxford, Violence and Poetic Resistance: (Re)locating the Origin of 1984 Attacks
  • Iqtidar Karamat Cheema, Institute for Leadership and Community Development Evolution of Sikh nationalism and state-led repression in Indian Punjab

To make the appropriate arrangements for lunch and refreshments for the day could you please confirm your attendance as soon as possible. As usual there is a nominal charge of £15 (waged) and £10 (student/unwaged). If you would like to attend, please email kaveri.qureshi@anthro.ox.ac.uk.  

See full programme for details: PRG 25 October 2014

Discovering Sikhism: 8 November 2014

Posted in Events by Pippa on October 14, 2014
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Invitation for an international conference on the Punjabi Diaspora’s linkages to host societies

Posted in Conferences by Pippa on October 8, 2014

The Department of Punjabi at Punjabi University has planned a three day conference on the Punjabi Diaspora on January 20-22, 2015. This will be a third such gathering of scholars with the main theme of this seminar will be an exploration of the Punjabi Diaspora’s interaction with host societies. The last two conferences were devoted to [a] Punjabi Diasporas’ linkage with Punjab as its ‘homeland’ [b] The first conference had a general theme while trying to map various aspects of the Punjabi Diaspora. This third conference, like the previous two, will be spread over three days. Scholars are invited to contribute on any of the topics falling under the main theme of the Punjabi Diaspora’s interaction with host societies which is elaborated below.

Please see attached for full details Diaspora Conference 2015

Lakhvir Singh, Chairman, Punjabi Department.

Email address: punjabidiasporaconference@gmail.com

Alternatively, please write to us at:

Department of Punjabi, Punjabi University, Patiala-147002, Punjab, India

 

Justice Denied/Collusion Denied 30 years later: Reflecting on 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on September 24, 2014

Symposium_poster copyJustice Denied/Collusion Denied

30 years later: Reflecting on 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms

Symposium and Academic Response

WHEN: Saturday, November 1st from 9AM-3PM

WHERE: Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies, University of the Fraser Valley, in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada Room F125

This academic response will feature a keynote address from Parvinder Kaur Mehta of Wayne State University as well as a panel of UFV scholars and a graduate student panel.

From Lost Childhood to Uncertain Future: 1984 Anti-Sikh Riots Victims

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on September 24, 2014

Exhibition_poster copyFrom Lost Childhood to Uncertain Future—The Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley presents an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of the anti-Sikh pogroms in Delhi. This exhibition features the photography of Mr. Sanjay Austa. The launch will include UFV speakers as well as a poetry reading from UFV students.

WHEN: Launch Date is Monday, October 27th at 4PM and the exhibition is available for viewing until November 13th

WHERE: Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies, Room F125

That Land Beyond the Waves – A Play Performance on the Komagata Maru

Posted in Events, News/Information by Pippa on September 24, 2014

FINAL Poster Imroze

That Land Beyond the Waves —A Play Performance on the Komagata Maru: The Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) in Abbotsford, B.C, Canada has commissioned the performance of a brand new play on the Komagata Maru. Written by Dr. Rajnish Dhawan and Directed by Dr. John Carroll of UFV’s Department of English

WHEN: Saturday, November 1st at 7PM and Matinee Performance on Sunday, November 2nd at 2PM

WHERE: Matsqui Centennial Auditorium

Tickets: $15.00 General; $10.00 for students: To purchase tickets, please visit: http://ucfv.bookware3000.ca/CourseSearch/?course%5B0%5D=EVENTS,FALL14,EVENT,KM%20EVENING&course%5B1%5D=EVENTS,FALL14,EVENT,KM%20MATINEE&

Winners of first annual Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature announced

Posted in News/Information, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on September 24, 2014

Based in Vancouver, Canada, The Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature aims to inspire the creation of Punjabi literature across borders, bridging Punjabi communities around the world, and promoting Punjabi literature on a global scale.

The Dhahan Prize awards $25,000 CDN annually to one best book in fiction published in either of the two Punjabi scripts, Gurmukhi or Shahmukhi. Two runner-up prizes of $5,000 CDN are also awarded, with the provision that both scripts are represented among the three winners. The Dhahan Prize is awarded by Canada India Education Society (CIES) in partnership with the Department of Asian Studies in the Faculty of Arts at University of British Columbia (UBC), and is funded by an endowment from Barj and Rita Dhahan, and family and friends.

The winners of the inaugural Dhahan Prize in Punjabi Literature are:

First Prize of $25,000: Khali Khoohaan di Katha (Novel) by Avtar Singh Billing (Gurmukhi script) India/USA

Runner Up Prize of $5,000: Ik Raat da Samunder (Short stories) by Jasbir Bhullar (Gurmukhi script) India

Runner Up Prize of $5,000: Kbooter, Bnairy te Galian (Short stories) by Zubair Ahmed (Shahmukhi script) Pakistan

I feel happy and lucky to be the first author to win the prestigious, inaugural Dhahan Prize in Punjabi Literature, said Avtar Singh Billing, author of Khali Khoohan di Katha. [Canada India Education Society] and the University of British Columbia have really created history by establishing such a unique, international award for Punjabi fiction. I feel proud that the Punjabi literary world found my sixth novel worthy of this honour.

Punjabi literature has a long and rich literary heritage and is produced around the world. Barj S. Dhahan, co-founder of CIES states, Punjabi has been a Canadian language for 115 years and it is exciting that this prize is uniquely a Canadian undertaking.

The Prize Advisory Committee has been central to developing an independent and impartial jury of senior writers and scholars to adjudicate the prize. Professor Anne Murphy, chair of the prize advisory committee explains, We have three juries: one to choose Shahmukhi books, one for Gurmukhi books, and one Central Jury that determines the winner. There is no overlap among the juries and the names of members are not disclosed until after adjudication is complete. It is crucial that we always maintain a strong and fair process.”

About the Dhahan Prize for Punjabi Literature:

The Dhahan Prize celebrates the rich culture and transnational heritage of Punjabi language and literature by awarding a yearly prize for excellence in Punjabi fiction. The Prize mission is to inspire the creation of Punjabi literature across borders, bridging Punjabi communities around the world and promoting Punjabi literature on a global scale. The Dhahan Prize is awarded by Canada India Education Society (CIES) in partnership with the Department of Asian Studies in the Faculty of Arts at University of British Columbia (UBC). Learn more at http://www.dhahanprize.com and join us on Facebook and Twitter.

Please read complete versions SEPT 22 2014 Dhahan Prize Winners Announced – EnglishSeptember 22 2014 – Dhahan Prize Winners Announced Gurmukhi Version and September 22 2014 – Dhahan Prize Winners Announced Shahmukhi Version

Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies

Posted in PhD Studentship by Pippa on September 19, 2014

PhD Studentships

Funded by the German federal and state governments’ Excellence Initiative, the Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies will admit up to fifteen PhD students to its doctoral programme, which is to begin on 1 October 2015. Up to ten of these candidates will receive a Graduate School grant; the other candidates will be supported in their search for funding.

The formal prerequisite for application to the programme is a master’s degree in one of the disciplines represented at the Graduate School, with ranking, where applicable, of above average (or German Magister or Diplom, with a grade of “very good”). Candidates are expected to submit an outline of the proposed dissertation project (maximum 6 pages, with a summary of no more than half a page), to include a short description of the topic, its relevance to the field, and its theoretical and methodological orientation, as well as a preliminary work schedule.

As English will be the primary language of communication, students are expected to have advanced English-language proficiency. In addition, students must demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) relevant to their projects. It is assumed that language skills can be improved during the course of the doctoral programme.

The application deadline is 15 November 2014.

Further details: http://www.bgsmcs.fu-berlin.de/en/application1/index.html

Who Killed Jugni? Shiraz Hassan

Posted in Articles by Pippa on September 19, 2014

It was many summers ago. I was visiting my village on the banks of the Jhelum. I saw the people of my village go towards the Eidgah, across the chappaD, or the pond. When I asked my grandfather about them, he said. “Ajj mela ay putter!” [Son, today is a fair!] The mela ground was bustling with makeshift shops and people thronging them. At one end of the mela a circus had come up. The mithai stalls were packed with customers and curious on-lookers, some of them were buying and eating. And that’s when I heard the sound of their music. There they were, surrounded by a circle of spectators. A couple of local artists sang a song I had not heard before. I couldn’t understand a word, other than ‘O mereya Jugni, O mereya Jugni’ – which they chorused, over and over again.

That was my introduction to Jugni. I had no idea who Jugni was, and for I long time I didn’t care.

Jugni returned to my life years later, making an entry in a different way. On a satellite TV channel, in a dimly lit studio, equipped heavily with musical instruments and a pungent smell of glamour. Arif Lohar was singing Jugni for Coke Studio and giving him company was Meesha Shafi!

This time, I wanted to know Jugni. Was it a character from a story? A glow-worm? Or something else?

‘Jugni’ is a Punjabi folk song, popular not only in the Punjab but also among the regional languages of Rajputana, Sindh and Hyderabad [1]. But Jugni has also been said to be a kind of jewel, an attractive ornament worn around the neck, a little like the ‘taweetri’. Worn alike by men and women, Jugni the ornament is usually made of gold or silver. The wooden jugni is also used as decorative jewellery for cows and buffaloes. This cow-Jugni is known as ‘gaani’. Along with other neck jewellery like necklaces, lockets, maalas, gaani, taweet or tweetri, Jugni is a hot favorite item of fashion among rural girls and boys.

Read full article: http://kafila.org/2011/05/07/who-killed-jugni-shiraz-hassan/

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Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership at DMU

Posted in PhD Studentship by Pippa on September 19, 2014

A great opportunity for UK/EU students. Have a look at the website for further details but if you are interested in developing a PhD project related to Punjab, Partition, women’s history in Pakistan or more broadly in another area of South Asian history please contact Dr Pippa Virdee (pvirdee@dmu.ac.uk) to discuss this further.

Offering you cross-institutional supervision, training, mentoring and career support to ensure that you produce world-leading research and maximise your career potential.

The Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) is a collaboration between De Montfort University and the universities of Nottingham, Nottingham Trent, Leicester, Birmingham and Birmingham City. This newly launched programme will provide you with combined research expertise for the personal and professional development, creating the next generation of arts and humanities doctoral researchers.

Through the partnership we aim to deliver excellence in all aspects of research supervision and training. We will assist you in acquiring the best supervision for your field of research, you will have access to a wide range of facilities and support networks across our campuses.

Visit DMU: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/midlands3cities-dtp/m3c.aspx

Visit http://www.midlands3cities.ac.uk to find out about this unique programme.

Mother and Daughter: Faiz Ahmed Faiz

Posted in Articles, Poetry and Literature by Pippa on September 19, 2014

In memory of Alys Faiz by Andrew Whitehead

15 September 2014

Alys George was born a century ago this month. She was better known as Alys Faiz – she married the renowned Pakistani poet, journalist and activist, Faiz Ahmed Faiz. I met and interviewed her twice at her home in Lahore in the 1990s – and I am posting the audio of those interviews on this blog with the blessing of her daughter, the artist Salima Hashmi.

Alys was the daughter of a bookseller in the London district of Walthamstow. In the 1930s in London, she became politically active eventually joining the Communist Party, and got to know Indian nationalists and leftists in London. In 1939, she travelled to Amritsar to visit her sister Christobel, who married Dr M.D. Taseer, a noted Marxist thinker and educationalist. Two years later, Alys and Faiz married at Pari Mahal in Srinagar – with the nikah conducted by Sheikh Abdullah.

When I interviewed her in Lahore in October 1995, Alys reminisced at length about becoming involved in the British Communist movement (‘I wanted to go to Spain but my parents said no’), getting to know Indian activists, coming out to Punjab and spending time in Kashmir. She recalled the tragic, cathartic violence which accompanied Partition, and spoke of her husband’s ranguished poetic reflection on the manner in which India and Pakistan gained independence, ‘Freedom’s Dawn’.

See Andrew Whitehead’s website to listen to the interviews: http://www.andrewwhitehead.net/blog/in-memory-of-alys-faiz

 

‘Perhaps some day I might end up as a poet after all’ By Salima Hashmi

7 March 2013

The daughter of Faiz Ahmed Faiz, the Subcontinent’s iconic bard, discovers letters exchanged by her mother and father.

Since being Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s daughter has given me privileged access to the family archives, I have become an accidental archivist. In 2009 I embarked upon the Faiz Ghar project to set up a small museum in a house leased to us by a friend and admirer of my father. We commenced sorting through Faiz’s belongings, papers and books. It was not a massive collection by any means, owing to his nomadic, rather Spartan, but interesting life, that began on 13 February 1911 and ended on 20 November 1984. My mother Alys was instrumental in saving and sorting what little there was: a smart grey lounge suit, a cap, his scarf, his pen, and a reasonably large cache of letters, certificates and medals.

After my mother’s death in 2003 all these things had been packed away in cartons in my house, waiting for just the sort of opportunity that the Faiz Ghar project afforded. Sifting through the papers, I came across a plastic bag containing some scraps. On closer look, I deciphered Faiz’s writing, and the unmistakable stamp of the censor from the Hyderabad Jail, where Faiz spent part of his imprisonment between 1951 and 1955 for his role in the Rawalpindi Conspiracy – a Soviet-backed coup attempt against Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan. These few letters were in poor shape, but readable. It is surprising that they have survived at all. Alys and Faiz had moved to Beirut in 1978. On return, all seemed to be in order in the house – except the cupboard, which had been attacked by termites. That cupboard contained Faiz’s letters from jail, which were later preserved with the help of Asma Ibrahim, transcribed by Kyla Pasha, and published in 2011 under the title Two Loves.

See Himal South Asia for full article: http://himalmag.com/perhaps-day-might-end-poet/

Fulbright – Robertson Visiting Professor In British History Award

Posted in Research Fellowships, Vacancies by Pippa on September 19, 2014

The US-UK Fulbright Commission

Closes: 31st October 2014

The US-UK Fulbright Commission is now accepting applications for its 2015-16 Robertson Visiting Professor in British History Award

This award provides a career-development opportunity for an exceptional, British historian to teach at Westminster College, Missouri, a small, selective liberal arts college for one academic year. The modest lecturing requirement will allow time for establishing a collaborative relationship with the US National Churchill Museum and Churchill Institute and for conducting personal research.

‘British Historian’ is inclusively defined: we welcome applications from historians of all time periods, thematic areas, and geographical regions of the British Isles, candidates with a specialisation in British Imperial or Colonial history and historians in interdisciplinary fields, such as art history, music history, or the history of science. The applicant should have at least one year’s experience of teaching undergraduates.

The Fulbright-Robertson Award offers the following benefits:

A grant of $52,500, plus travel allowance of up to $10,000

A number of memberships

Sickness and accident benefit coverage

Visa sponsorship

Substantial pre-departure support, including a Finalists Workshop (March) and a 2-day Orientation Programme (July)

Once on-the-ground in the US, further support is offered by the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars (CIES)

Membership of an extensive Fulbright Alumni network after grant completion

Eligibility requirements: Applicants must be a UK citizen (resident anywhere) and hold or expect to receive a PhD (or equivalent professional training or experience) in a relevant area before departure to the US. Those who hold or who are eligible to hold US citizenship, or who are resident in the US at the time of application, may not apply for an Award from the US-UK Fulbright Commission.

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