Punjab Research Group

PRG meeting 27 June 2015, SOAS

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on June 26, 2015

The Politics of the Social and Beyond:

Hegemonies, Resistances, and Negotiations

B102, Brunei Gallery, SOAS, University of London, WC1H OXG

27 June 2015 at 10:00 AM

https://www.soas.ac.uk/visitors/location/maps/#RussellSquareCampusMap

Full Programme: PRG Programme June 2015

Samina Bashir (Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad)

The Communal Award in Colonial Punjab: Implications and Impacts for Sikhs

Michael Nijhawan (Department of Sociology, York University, Canada)

The Asylum Courts’ Radiating Effect on Religion

Nicola Mooney (University of the Fraser Valley, Canada)

Caste, Dominance, and the Question of Form

Kavita Bhanot (University of Manchester)

Unpacking Multiculturalism and Hybridity: ‘Self’ and ‘Other’ in ‘Third Generation’ British Asian Literature

Yaqoob Khan Bangash (Forman Christian College, Lahore)

Bahawalpur State and Pakistan, 1947-55: Accession and Integration

And book launch of A Princely Affair: The Accession and Integration of the Princely States of Pakistan, 1947-1955 (OUP, 2015)

Radhika Chopra (Department of Sociology, University of Delhi)

Seeing off the dead: Post mortem photographs in the Durbar Sahib

Silas Webb (Doctoral Candidate, Department of History, Syracuse University)

State Surveillance, Neighbourhood Formation and Diaspora Politics: The ‘Pedlar Fraternity’ in Glasgow, 1925-1949

Virinder S. Kalra (School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester)

Book Launch and reception, with musical performance and dialogue with Rajveer Singh, Hardeep Singh Siera and Amrit Kaur Lohia: Sacred and Secular Musics: A Postcolonial Approach (Bloomsbury Press, 2015)

cfp: International Sikh Research Conference (ISRC)

Posted in Conferences, Events by Pippa on February 16, 2015

We are pleased to announce the call for papers (C4p) and registrations for the second International Sikh Research Conference (ISRC). The conference will take place at the prestigious University of Warwick on the 28 June 2015.

The second conference draws on the unprecedented success of the first ISRC, 2014 by bringing together academics, scholars and researchers and to encourage a spirit of collaboration within international Sikh studies academia.

Scholars, researchers and academics are encouraged to submit a paper which highlights research on any of the following themes: Musicology, History, Philosophy, Scripture, Diaspora, Identity, and Politics.

The call for papers for the second Sikh Research Conference is now live at http://www.sikhconference.co.uk.
See attachment for further details: Call for Papers
Regards
Gurinder Singh Mann
http://www.sikhscholar.co.uk

International Conference on “1947 : RETHINKING” 13th – 14th March, 2015

Posted in Conferences, Partition by Pippa on February 15, 2015

1947: Rethinking

Organised by Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

For participation and further details please contact:-

Director of the Conference:

Prof. Amarjit Singh, Chairman, Department of History, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (Haryana) (M) – 098121-84925

Landline No (s) – 01744-238410, 238196, 238679, Extn. 2558 & 2559 (Office)

 

Organizing Secretaries:

Dr. Nandini Bashistha, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 09729074479

Mr. Dharamveer Saini, Assistant Professor, Department of History, K.U.Kurukshetra (M) – 097288-61900

 

Email:

chairperson.history@kuk.ac.in

amarjitsingh_45@yahoo.co.in

Please attached for full details:Concept Note-1, Information regarding International Conference-1

SGPC to set up ‘censor board’ for films, books on Sikhs

Posted in Articles by Pippa on February 4, 2015

Jan 26, 2015

CHANDIGARH: Films and books on Sikh religion may soon have to pass the test of the Shiromani Gurudwara Prabhandak Committee (SGPC), which is planning to set up a ‘censor board’ for “moral policing” of the scripts.

The move comes against the backdrop of the controversy surrounding Dera Sacha Sauda chief’s movie ‘MSG’ and many Bollywood movies in which actors have donned the turban like Ajay Devgn starrer ‘Son of Sardar’ and Akshay Kumar starrer ‘Singh is King’.

“We will soon set up Sikh Censor Board comprising historians and intelligentsia so that someone keen to make any film or write a book concerning Sikh religion first gets the script cleared to avoid consequences later,” Amritsar-based SGPC head Avtar Singh Makkar told this agency.

Terming it as “moral policing” on part of SGPC, Makkar said the board members will clear the script of films or books based on Sikh religion and community members.

“Our idea is that Sikh religion is projected and exhibited in public domain in consonance with the spirit of code of conduct of the community,” he said.

Please read the rest of the article: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/SGPC-to-set-up-censor-board-for-films-books-on-Sikhs/articleshow/46018615.cms

Read attached PDF: SGPC Censor-TOI-1 Feb 2015

Sikhs in Latin America

Posted in Diaspora, News/Information, sikhs by Pippa on November 26, 2014

PRG meeting 25 October, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Posted in PRG Meetings by Pippa on October 14, 2014

This is a reminder that the next PRG meeting is coming up soon on 25 October. The meeting focuses on the events of 1984 and beyond and will take place at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. Pritam Singh, Iftikhar Malik and Kaveri Qureshi are kindly convening the meeting. Please see the attachment for the full programme and directions to the University. Speakers include:

  • Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes University, India and the Sikhs since 1984: mapping the fault lines
  • Radhika Chopra, University of Delhi, A coincidence of commemoration
  • Nardina Kaur, Radical Philosophy, Deleuze and communalism: heuristic, therapeutic and preventive practice
  • Nuzhat Abbas & Alison Street, Parents Early Education Partnership, Working with Punjabi speaking families to support mother tongue through songs, rhymes and stories: challenges and opportunities
  • Amar Sohal, University of Oxford, Seeking a voice: the demand for Azad Punjab
  • Prabhsharandeep Singh, University of Oxford, Violence and Poetic Resistance: (Re)locating the Origin of 1984 Attacks
  • Iqtidar Karamat Cheema, Institute for Leadership and Community Development Evolution of Sikh nationalism and state-led repression in Indian Punjab

To make the appropriate arrangements for lunch and refreshments for the day could you please confirm your attendance as soon as possible. As usual there is a nominal charge of £15 (waged) and £10 (student/unwaged). If you would like to attend, please email kaveri.qureshi@anthro.ox.ac.uk.  

See full programme for details: PRG 25 October 2014

A Qissa for a Globalised by Kavita Bhanot

Posted in Articles, Film by Pippa on August 19, 2014

QissaA Qissa for a Globalised World August 17, 2014

[Following is a guest post by Kavita Bhanot. She is a London based writer. Her short stories and non-fiction have been published widely in anthologies, magazines and journals, two of her stories have been broadcast on BBC Radio 4, and she is the editor of the short story collection Too Asian, Not Asian Enough (Tindal Street Press, 2011.) ]

There has, of late, been a revival of Punjabi cinema directed towards and watched by Punjabi audiences. A recent addition to Punjabi language cinema, albeit less ‘commercial’ and more ‘artistic’ is the Punjabi language film Qissa: Tale of a Lonely Ghost which has been doing the rounds at international film festivals and was screened last week at the London Indian Film Festival.

The film is about the violent consequences of son obsession in a Sikh refugee family in post-partition East Punjab.Visually striking, Qissa stands out for its cinematography; the framing, the use of shadows and light, the unusual angles. It was often absorbing, most of all in the scenes between actresses Tillotama Shome and Rasika Dugal, playing the couple Kanwar Singh and Neeli who find themselves in a predicament after marriage when they both discover that Kawar is actually a woman. Their interactions quiver with layered tension and chemistry.

Ultimately, however, the film doesn’t quite come together, it seems to lack internal coherence. I found myself watching it with a sense of unease, it didn’t carry me through, and when, in the post film discussion, the director spoke about the qissa tradition, connecting his film to this ‘genre,’ my discomfort increased.

Encompassed in the title, in the main heading (Qissa) and the subheading (The Tale of the Lonely Ghost), are two very different conceptions of storytelling, the film seems to hover between both of these, but falls ultimately, in the framework of the latter.

The Qissa is a storytelling tradition that is woven into the lives, culture of Punjabis. Qissas have been retold, reinterpreted in each era, often through music – the Sufi versions of these stories that are most well-known. Rooted in time and place – it is through particularity, detail, a connection with everyday life that qissas speak to the people of the region. Waris Shah weaves into Heer, perhaps the most popular qissa, painstaking, almost sociological detail about the customs, practices, beliefs, social, economic and political structures of the time. Qissas often portray, through love stories, the defiance and rebellion of ordinary people, exploring the radical potential of love and sexuality, as lovers and their accomplices defy the conventions, religion, ‘morality’ of an oppressive society. Qissas, in this way, critique social, political institutions, challenging power at all levels. While the lovers in Sufi qissas simultaneously symbolise the relationship between devotee and pir or guru, it is through the details, the emotion and earthiness of lived life that they become metaphors, that they become universal. Sufis understood that this was the way to connect with people.

Read full article: http://www.chapatimystery.com/archives/potpurri/a_qissa_for_a_globalised_world.html

cfp: 4th Sikh Studies Conference, University of California

Posted in Conferences, Events by Pippa on August 19, 2014

 

The Department of Religious Studies at the University of California Riverside and the Dr. Jasbir Singh Saini endowed Chair in Sikh and Punjabi Studies are inviting papers for an international Sikh Studies conference on the theme of “Living and Making Sikhi in the Diaspora: The Millennial Generation Comes of Age” on May 8-9, 2015

 

The conference will be a two day event of panel discussions, and will be held at the newly-built Interdisciplinary Building (Symposium INTS 1113) of the Riverside Campus of the University of California. The abstracts of the papers are due by December 15, 2014 and complete papers by April 15, 2015. Attendance at the seminar will be open to graduate students, faculty and the public.

Please find the call for proposals in the attached pdf: Call 4th Sikh Studies Conference 2015

 

Organizers

Chair of the Organizing Committee: Professor Pashaura Singh

Members: Professor Verne A. Dusenbery and Charles M. Townsend

Event Coordinator: Ryan A. Mariano

 

 

cfp: Oxford Sikh Society

Posted in Conferences, News/Information, sikhs by Pippa on August 19, 2014

We are excited to announce the launch of the next event in our series of ‘Discovering Sikhism’ open days.

Our new programme will be held at St Antony’s College, Oxford in November 2014, and will focus on exploring the history of the Sikhs under the British Raj. As ever, we are looking to provide critical historical insights and stimulating intellectual discussions on Sikh/Punjab Studies, with the aim of making academic research more accessible and engaging for a wide-ranging audience.

This year, we would like to open up our programme entirely, and invite you all to either present research papers or any kind of artistic work (be it film, poetry, song, drama, art or expressive dance!) that relates to the historical and cultural themes we intend to explore.

Please see attached a document to this email outlining further details about our ideas and goals for the 2014 open day, with a call at the end for relevant proposals to be submitted to us at oxford.sikhsoc@gmail.com. It would be fantastic to have your support!

We look forward to hearing from you with submission ideas in due course, and please do feel free to forward this email on to anyone whose work you think might be valuable to include within our programme. Should you have any questions about the event or Oxford’s Sikh Society in general, do not hesitate to drop us a line.

Full details: CfP Discovering Sikhism 2014

Priya Atwal, Vice President (2014-15), Oxford University Sikh Society

 

ROAD TO MANDALAY – SIKHS IN BURMA by Swarn Singh Kahlon

Posted in Articles, Diaspora, Migration by Pippa on July 30, 2014

Based on Travels of Swarn Singh Kahlon, December, 2011

Article appeared in The Sikh Review, Kolkata, February, 2014 issue.

 

THE ROMANCE OF BURMA

There are two romantic poems about Burma;

ONE by Rudyard Kipling (1889-90),

where he tries to relive on return to London his travels in Burma:

By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin’ lazy at the sea,

There’s a Burma girl a-settin’, and I know she thinks o’ me;

For the wind is in the palm-trees, and the Temple-bells they say:

“Come you back, you British soldier; come you back to Mandalay!”

 

AND THE SECOND

By the exiled Mughal King, Bahadur Shah Zafar who immortalised his death in Burma (1862) through the epitaph he wrote on the wall with a burnt stick:

Kitna hai badnaseeb Zafar, dafan ke liye

do gaz zamin na mili ku e yaar mein”

 

This was also the period when Sikhs started to migrate to Burma; a country now renamed ‘Myanmar’. The Sikh migration to Burma was an important component of global Sikh migration and remained a popular destination for about six decades.

Many Sikhs have their relatives and friends who still talk about the Burma days even if they have returned permanently since long back. A visit was very tempting especially as my wife’s mother was born and grew up in that country. Whenever my mother-in-law and her sisters had some confidences to share they would shift to speaking Burmese even after their return three decades ago.

Read full article: Road to Mandalay

PRG Conference 27-28 June 2014, Coventry University – revised programme

Posted in Conferences, PRG Meetings by Pippa on June 11, 2014

As you know this year we are celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Punjab Research Group. To celebrate this milestone we have teamed up with Dr Churnjeet Mahn, University of Surrey, and are planning a two-day conference at Coventry University. The conference will be supported by the AHRC project, ‘A Punjabi Palimpsest: Cultural Memory and Amnesia at the Aam Khas Bagh’. A website connected to the project can be found here: http://www.thegtroad.com.

Attached are all the details for the conference, including the programme and abstracts. If you would like to attend please complete the registration form and send this to me by Thursday 19 June. Please note that the programme for Saturday has been revised and extended.

Abstracts

PRG 27-28 June 2014

Useful Information

blank registration form

British Sikh Report 2013 – A Review

Posted in Book reviews, Journal of Punjab Studies, News/Information by gsjandu on October 27, 2013

download

In the summer of 2013, the first ever British Sikh Report was published using both the 2011 national census in England and Wales and an organic survey that attracted over 600 respondents – one of the most significant of its kind. Here a PRG website contributor offers their review as the annualised exercise begins for the next version in 2014. Please click on the link below for the review article.

bsr2013 reviewarticle

This post’s author can be contacted on: gorby.jandu@gmail.com

%d bloggers like this: