Punjab Research Group

Sikhs in Latin America

Posted in Diaspora, News/Information, sikhs by Pippa on November 26, 2014

cfp: Oxford Sikh Society

Posted in Conferences, News/Information, sikhs by Pippa on August 19, 2014

We are excited to announce the launch of the next event in our series of ‘Discovering Sikhism’ open days.

Our new programme will be held at St Antony’s College, Oxford in November 2014, and will focus on exploring the history of the Sikhs under the British Raj. As ever, we are looking to provide critical historical insights and stimulating intellectual discussions on Sikh/Punjab Studies, with the aim of making academic research more accessible and engaging for a wide-ranging audience.

This year, we would like to open up our programme entirely, and invite you all to either present research papers or any kind of artistic work (be it film, poetry, song, drama, art or expressive dance!) that relates to the historical and cultural themes we intend to explore.

Please see attached a document to this email outlining further details about our ideas and goals for the 2014 open day, with a call at the end for relevant proposals to be submitted to us at oxford.sikhsoc@gmail.com. It would be fantastic to have your support!

We look forward to hearing from you with submission ideas in due course, and please do feel free to forward this email on to anyone whose work you think might be valuable to include within our programme. Should you have any questions about the event or Oxford’s Sikh Society in general, do not hesitate to drop us a line.

Full details: CfP Discovering Sikhism 2014

Priya Atwal, Vice President (2014-15), Oxford University Sikh Society

 

New Publication on Sikh Studies: Diaspora: A Journal for Transnational Studies

Posted in Academic Journals, Diaspora, Migration, New Publications, News/Information, sikhs by gsjandu on April 9, 2014
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The Sikh Turban: Exploring An Icon Of A Migratory Peoples’ Identity

Posted in Events, Migration, Research, sikhs by gsjandu on May 15, 2013

Research Consultation: Anthropological Collection on Sikh Turbans

The Horniman Museum, London

Kind assistance is requested with researching a collection displaying the dastar as part of Sikhs’ global migration. The collection has three aspirations; to firstly display the pagh’s physical variation as geographically dichotomous and freighting a regionally intrinsic identity trope for instance Makhan Singh as a kalasingha wearing a Kenyan kilemba. Secondly to consider the pagh and its contentious role in Sikh identity within the milieu of other head-coverings e.g. Mitres in Europe during The Middle Ages. Thirdly to reflect on the pagh in Sikh-Britain relationships e.g. Winterhalter’s 1854 portrait of Duleep Singh  or turbaned Sikhs as stock British Armed Forces’ media images. Thoughts on the collection mode and process are especially welcomed. The Horniman Museum Collections can be explored at www.horniman.ac.uk, whilst the researchers can be reached on gorby.jandu@gmail.com and JZetterstrom-Sharp@horniman.ac.uk. The collection is due to gain exhibition in 2014 with displays finalised by end 2013.

They lost their childhood to the 1984 Anti-Sikh Riots

Posted in Articles, Photography, sikhs by Pippa on May 1, 2013
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Beyond Belief ‘Women in Sikhism’

Posted in sikhs by Pippa on February 14, 2013

You can still listen to this discussion on the BBC Radio 4 was aired on Monday 14 January at 16.30 (GMT).

The fundamental message of Sikhism appears to be simple; God is one and all people are equal. But are some more equal than others? If the Sikh scriptures are consistent with a feminist agenda, why do some Sikh women feel that they are second class citizens?
Joining Ernie to discuss the position of women within the Sikh tradition are Navtej Purewal, Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at Manchester University; Eleanor Nesbitt, Professor Emeritus at the Institute of Education in the University of Warwick; and Nicky Guninder Kaur Singh, Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Colby College Waterville Maine in the USA

Here’s a link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01ptgfy

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Researching Wedding Photography in Birmingham: request for contacts

Posted in Diaspora, Networking, Photography, Research, sikhs by santhyb on December 17, 2012
I’m a doctoral candidate in visual anthropology at University of Oxford, and a contributor to the PRG blog. This is to seek your assistance in setting up my fieldwork. My research looks at wedding photography as a mode of representation amongst the Sikh diaspora in the UK. If you have contacts in Birmingham, especially amongst the Sikh community in Birmingham so I can meet someone even if it is for an informal chat, I’d love to hear from you. Since it is an anthropology project I plan to conduct fieldwork involving interviews and participant observation with wedding photographers covering Sikh weddings. It would be wonderful if you know anyone who does Asian wedding photography and would be interested in collaborating/ being interviewed for the project. I’d also love to talk to engaged and newly-wed couples about their wedding ceremonies, wedding albums, how they chose their photographer etc. I would be grateful for any ideas as to how to make contacts so I can attend a few Sikh weddings and get a sense of how the ceremonies are organised and documented via photography and videography.
I’m happy to provide you more details if you can help. My email id is: santhy.balachandran@wolfson.ox.ac.uk
I look forward to hearing from you.
Thanks,
Santhy
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2012 Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film Conference at Hofstra University

Posted in Conferences, Research, sikhs by harjant on September 29, 2012

2012 Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film Conference at Hofstra University 

Fall 2012, October 19-21, 2012

Sponsored by the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies

Sikhi(sm), Literature and Film 
Hofstra University and the Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Chair in Sikh Studies are excited to announce a conference on the literary and visual cultures within, or pertaining to, Sikh traditions both in Panjabi and Diasporic contexts. The conference is designed to be explorative and is therefore open to any and all submissions within these two fields. This conference aims to chart new territory by exploring the aesthetic and expressive traditions within Sikh(ism).

REGISTRATION – NOW OPEN (Click here) 

CONFERENCE PROGRAM (Click here) 

 

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Unthreatening the Sikh Turban – Reflections of Wisconsin Shootings

Posted in Articles, Diaspora, Film, Migration, News/Information, sikhs by harjant on September 2, 2012

Unthreatening the Sikh Turban – Reflections on Wisconsin Shootings by Harjant S. Gill

[W]e must discourage the use of mistaken identity narrative because to an extremist like…the gunman who carried out the Wisconsin shooting, it matters little if his victims are Sikhs or Muslims. We must denounce all acts of violence against any religious groups. More importantly, we must also hold our politicians,policy makers, political pundits and ourselves responsible for creating a climate of hostility and hate… read more: Anthropology-News.org

Sikhs in Europe. Migration, Identities and Representations, Edited by Knut A. Jacobsen & Kristina Myrvold

Posted in New Publications, sikhs by Pippa on February 10, 2012

Sikhs in Europe. Migration, Identities and Representations, Edited by Knut A. Jacobsen, University of Bergen, Norway; Kristina Myrvold, Lund University, Sweden (Ashgate, 2011)

Sikhs in Europe are neglected in the study of religions and migrant groups: previous studies have focused on the history, culture and religious practices of Sikhs in North America and the UK, but few have focused on Sikhs in continental Europe. This book fills this gap, presenting new data and analyses of Sikhs in eleven European countries; examining the broader European presence of Sikhs in new and old host countries. Focusing on patterns of migration, transmission of traditions, identity construction and cultural representations from the perspective of local Sikh communities, this book explores important patterns of settlement, institution building and cultural transmission among European Sikhs.

Contents: Introduction: Sikhs in Europe, Knut A. Jacobsen and Kristina Myrvold; Part I Sikhs in Northern and Eastern Europe: Institutionalization of Sikhism in Norway: community growth and generational transfer, Knut A. Jacobsen; The Sikh community in Denmark: balancing between cooperation and conflict, Helene Ilkjaer; The Swedish Sikhs: community building, representation and generational change, Kristina Myrvold; Sikhs in Finland: migration histories and work in the restaurant sector, Laura Hirvi; The Sikhs in Poland: a short history of migration and settlement, Zbigniew Igielski. Part II Sikhs in Southern Europe: Mirror games: a fresco of Sikh settlements among Italian local societies, Barbara Bertolani, Federica Ferraris and Fabio Perocco; ‘Did you get papers?’: Sikh migrants in France, Christine Moliner; Caste, religion, and community assertion: a case study of the Ravidasias in Spain, Kathryn Lum; Sikh immigrants in Greece: on the road to integration, Niki Papageorgiou. Part III Sikhs in the United Kingdom and Ireland: Sikh diversity in the UK: contexts and evolution, Eleanor Nesbitt; Sikh-ing beliefs: British Sikh camps in the UK, Jasjit Singh; The Valmiki, Ravidasi and Namdhari communities in Britain: self-representations and transmission of traditions, Opinderjit Kaur Takhar; The Sikh diaspora in Ireland: a short history, Glenn Jordan and Satwinder Singh; Glossary; Index.

Link to publisher – Ashgate: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&pageSubject=549&calcTitle=1&sort=pubdate&forthcoming=1&title_id=10934&edition_id=14157

The Lost British Accounts of Sikh Texts, 27th November 2011

Posted in Events, News/Information, sikhs by hassanjavid on November 16, 2011

1984 and the violence of memory

Posted in Articles, sikhs by santhyb on November 1, 2011

Opinion piece by Ravinder Kaur in The Hindu

More than a quarter century on, not much remains of ‘1984′ — shorthand for one of the largest pogroms in India’s postcolonial history when thousands of Sikhs were massacred in retribution for Prime Minister Indira Gandhi’s assassination — in the public memory. The voices of victims and eyewitnesses one often heard in courtrooms have almost retired in exhaustion. The names of state-appointed serial commissions to establish the facts on ground have by now joined footnotes of history in a long line of ineffective judicial commissions of similar nature. And more remarkably, the miscarriage of justice through long-winded judicial processes where eyewitnesses routinely turn hostile due to threats, incentives, pressures exerted by fixers, or because of plain weariness has ceased evoking any mass outrage. In any case, the victims are supposed to have ‘got over’ the event and ‘moved on,’ precisely as enterprising and forward-looking communities are expected to do.

Read full article: 1984 and the violence of memory

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